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Archive for August, 2009

Ian Wallace’s Epic Journey

In the News, Random Notes

Ian Wallace – a Royal Enfield owner, MPVA member and vintage Military Vehicle enthusiast – recently undertook an epic journey with his Royal Enfield Bullet Military. He joined the 2009 MVPA Convoy for it’s historic trek across America, recreating the 1919 transcontinenal convoy of the US Army’s Military Transportation Corps.

2009 MVPA Convoy Map

2009 MVPA Convoy Map

Ian and his Bullet Military started in Washington, D.C. and traveled with the convoy through 8 states to Wyoming.

However, about an hour outside the convoy’s stop in Rawlins, Wyoming when the worst happened: Ian was struck by a car while riding his Military. Fortunately, Ian lived to tell the tale but unfortunately, he was badly injured and unable to continue his journey. We checked in with Ian recently who, despite still being in for treatment at the time, was good enough to send us a personal account of his trip:

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Tech Corner: Carburetor Troubleshooting (Classic)

Tech Tips

Note: this is a Tech Corner: Classic Edition article pertaining to the traditional Iron-Barrel Bullet 500 engine design (based on the 1955 model Bullet). It was originally published in our Bullet-In newsletter in December 2003. These articles are being re-published for the new audience of used Royal Enfield owners.

Originally published 12/2003 – Earlier this week, the boys (actually young men) in our shop were converting my bike from the “Twingle” back to a single-exhaust 535 and couldn’t get it started. When they turned on the fuel, it would pour out of the overflow hoses. They assumed (as did I) that the float was stuck in the open position. This can often be resolved by a swift tap to the carburetor bowl. However, when no amount of “tapping” slowed the fuel down, I had them remove the carburetor and replace the needle and seat. These do need to be replaced occasionally and this is why it’s a good idea to get in the habit of turning off your fuel tap when the bike is not in use.
After replacing the needle and seat, the bike still wouldn’t start but was not overflowing. I felt the bowl and since it wasn’t cold, I checked to see if it had fuel in it. It did not. Again we tried the tapping method to see if it had jammed slightly when the bowl was reinstalled. We had no luck. I had the boys remove the bowl and look for any obstruction to the floats. Seeing none, it occurred to me that we hadn’t reset the float bowl height. This is a commonly overlooked procedure.
In short, you remove the carburetor and its bowl and turn them upside down. According to the factory specification, the distance from the face of the float bowl to the top of the inverted float should be between 28 and 30mm. I personally prefer to set it between 26 and 28mm. If it is too high or too low you can bend the tang on the float bowl where it touches the needle to adjust the height. Be very careful not to apply pressure to the needle and risk damaging it when doing this adjustment.
Sure enough, this cured our problem. The float had been set too high and was cutting off the flow of fuel before the float bowl had the proper amount in it. The wrong float height setting can also cause your bike to run too rich or too lean. So the next time you have the carburetor off or replace the needle and seat be sure to check it.

Earlier this week, the boys (actually young men) in our shop were converting my bike from the “Twingle” back to a single-exhaust 535 and couldn’t get it started. When they turned on the fuel, it would pour out of the overflow hoses. They assumed (as did I) that the float was stuck in the open position. This can often be resolved by a swift tap to the carburetor bowl. However, when no amount of “tapping” slowed the fuel down, I had them remove the carburetor and replace the needle and seat. These do need to be replaced occasionally and this is why it’s a good idea to get in the habit of turning off your fuel tap when the bike is not in use…

Read the rest of this entry »

2009 Sun Valley Reunion

Events
Sun Valley Reunion

Sun Valley Reunion

Each year, the Sun Valley Service Center hosts a great rally for riders and enthusiasts on the west coast. There’s always a great group of people that turn out for the event and, of course, great riding in the gorgeous wine country of northern California!

Here’s the latest on this year’s rally from Guy:

Labor Day weekend is just around the corner. It is time to reserve your room in Plymouth, Calif.

We are staying at the Shenandoah Inn 1-800-542-4549 for reservations.  For the people in the Reno area, we will be leaving Saturday AM and riding over Hwy 88 to Plymouth,  Calif. and west coast people will meet up at the Shenandoah Inn. We will ride to some wineries Saturday afternoon, and then plan a 125 to 150 mile loop throught the gold and wine country on Sunday.

We found a great RV campground just a few miles North of the Inn, on HWY 49.

No entry fees this year, hope to see as many as possible attend.

Call 775-673-9611 for more information and be sure to mark your calendar!

     
Enfield in Twighlight