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Author Topic: Protecting some Wiring  (Read 1193 times)

Arizoni

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Protecting some Wiring
« on: July 02, 2011, 12:34:06 AM »
I mentioned that I added some shielding to the wiring in the area of my fuses on my G5.

There are a number of sharp metal edges in this area and if just one of the wires has their insulation cut thru or if the wire is severed problems will occur.

It isn't pretty but the slit tubing I put over the wires that were coming close or hitting metal objects should protect them better than the black plastic electrical tape that covers them.

I used some 1/4" clear tubing and some 3/8" gas line which I slit from end to end so I could open it and tuck the wiring inside of it.

The photo below shows what I ended up with.
The arrow at the top of the photo pointing off of the edge is pointing at a piece of slit 3/8" gasline I put over the wire that runs from the solenoid to the starter.  It was pushing against the sharp edge of the metal side cover before I tucked it inside the tube.

In several places I used some electrical tape to hold the newly installed tubes shut after tucking the wiring inside of them.

The double arrows at the bottom are pointing to the same short length of 3/8" gas line which is passing behind the lock bracket.  The idea here was to protect the wiring from both the bracket and from the rotating lock paddle.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2011, 12:38:25 AM by Arizoni »
Jim
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1999 Miata 10th Anniversary

FiRE Comms

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2011, 12:53:36 AM »
 This is a fantastic post, thanks!
Chris

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2011, 01:23:05 AM »
Hey Arizoni ,
         Don't you wonder why they didn't do this at the factory ? I would think that the quality department would be aware of simple things like sharp edges, hardware that vibrates loose, and any other problems that come from simple lack of quality control. Is it to much to ask for RE to use locking hardware or Locktite ? How about making sure the wiring harness won't be cut on sharp edges because of lack of protection. I love my Royal Enfield G5 Deluxe.......I wonder if the people at the factory really care about the quality, or just a paycheck.

Arizoni

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2011, 04:07:54 AM »
It is easy to blame the Quality department but as a one time Quality Assurance Engineer I can say that at the aerospace company where I worked, a Quality Control (or Assurance) Engineer is there to make sure the assembly and hardware conforms with the Engineering Drawings and to make sure the parts are assembled per the  Engineering Drawings.
That is their prime function.

If they see obvious design errors they can alert Engineering to the problem however it is up to Engineering Design to determine how the problem is fixed.
The Engineering Department is solely responsible for the design requirements and methods used in making the product.

The wiring harness seems to be a weak area but I've never seen the harness in an Iron Barrel or a AVL.
I'm guessing that similar wire sizes and designs of the harness were used in the design of  those models and there were not enough complaints to make the Engineering Department aware of a significant problem.
When this happens, the older designs become the basis for the new designs.

It's a shame this sort of thing happens because there is no doubt that they put a lot of design effort into making the UCE.  Had they gone the "last mile" and increased the wire diameter, improved the wire insulation and connectors and wrapped the entire harness in something that really would protect it from sharp edges and fretting they would have had a winner that would easily compare with the best motorcycles from Japan.

As for fasteners vibrating loose, I note that in a number of areas they are using self locking nuts which is commendable. 
I agree with you that if they made it a point to install the regular fasteners with a thread locking compound a number of complaints would never be made.
There are a few areas where thread locking compounds won't work.  The heat shield screws for instance get too hot. and nuts with deformed self locking threads like MS21043 are not practical.
Jim
2011 G5 Deluxe
1999 Miata 10th Anniversary

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2011, 04:17:46 AM »
Great post!  I've got the plastic tubing here, so I will do some protecting tomorrow.

A Royal Enfield owner's cup is always half full.

singhg5

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2011, 04:31:42 PM »
Like your idea of covering wires with clear tubing or gas line. Great picture with pointing arrows ! Thanks.
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gashousegorilla

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2011, 05:46:21 PM »
  Good idea's Arizoni.......Hear is one for the C-5 guys.  This one almost got me.. yikes!
Rear top motor mount. The back side of the bracket has a sharp edge. I just moved the harness in front of it, on the smooth side,  A little rubber and some tie-raps and your good.
An thaibhsí atá rattling ag an doras agus tá sé an diabhal sa chathaoir.

jartist

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2011, 06:46:54 AM »
I had a Kawasaki KLR that had a harness recall and a short due to chafing on a sharp part of the frame that left me stranded. I ended up spending hours rerouting wires and wrapping and insulating vulnerable spots.  Hondas were known for burning up rectifiers. Which Japanese motorcycles are everyone talking about? After a few wire issues with four or so motorcycles I've made it a habit to go over any new ride I get. ESPECIALLY if it's a thumper!

r80rt

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2011, 01:53:26 PM »
Yeah, what he said.
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Arizoni

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2011, 05:00:26 AM »
I got to nosing around again and I guess it was just laziness on my part that I didn't look under the chrome cover on the left side of my G5 (hot dog holder?)

There are three relays inside and here again, a branch of the wiring harness is passing thru a sharp edged hole.

Time for some more split tubing.  ;D

Jim
2011 G5 Deluxe
1999 Miata 10th Anniversary

ROVERMAN

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2011, 05:15:24 PM »
Part of the issue with poorly designed/specce'd/routed wiring is the cost.Copper is not only costly but it is very heavy.Just my 2 cents worth.
Robert and REnfield.

singhg5

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2011, 03:38:52 PM »
I didn't look under the chrome cover on the left side of my G5 (hot dog holder?) ....... a branch of the wiring harness is passing thru a sharp edged hole....

Your posts got me looking for my G5 and found 'weak spots' - where the wires are vulnerable due to rubbing on sharp edges or stress against a metal edge.  

i) Next to battery, there was one wire that goes to fuse - it is very close behind the lock latch and strike plate hole. That was THE most vulnerable to get a cut if it is caught in the latch.  Covered it with vinyl tubing and then electric tape.  Made it much more secure. Also had twist tied other wires to keep them together away from latch (16764A).

Also the battery cover inside had paint scratched off places where it touched something - wires/frame/ties. Covered them with a weatherstrip foam (16775A).

ii) An unexpected spot - Behind air filer, there was a sharp edge protruding from the air hole. The wires run behind it.  Filed it to smooth edge (16720A21A).  
« Last Edit: July 15, 2011, 03:46:52 PM by singhg5 »
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singhg5

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2011, 03:44:25 PM »
had to split post into two parts -

iii) You are absolutely right about Left Hand Side Decor (Hot dog). I saw stress marks on the wire where it rubbed off the metal slot edge (16733A) - fortunately it had not cut yet. I wrapped electric tape around the wire and it looked better (16751A).
« Last Edit: July 15, 2011, 03:48:27 PM by singhg5 »
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WillW

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2011, 03:55:27 PM »
Thanks for all these tips. We have a rainy Devon weekend on the cards and I'm planning to spend a day in the garage checking & improving my G5's wiring.
I'm hoping my second replacement starter relay will arrive too so I can get it fitted. Hopefully it will be the new improved Jap model this time!
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clubman

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2011, 09:03:46 AM »

I'm hoping my second replacement starter relay will arrive too so I can get it fitted. Hopefully it will be the new improved Jap model this time!

Well, quite. Me too, to go with the two sprag clutch replacements. I've completely given up on the electric starting of this machine even though it still has a few months of warranty left. I figure that however often you fix it something else will go in a couple of months and when the warranty is over I certainly wouldn't waste good money on it. It's starting first kick every time which is a lot more reliable and a lot less stressful. Anyway, good luck with your wiring exercise, let us know how you got on!

bman734

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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2011, 12:00:36 PM »
Thanks for the wiring protection tips. I will go over my C5 as soon as I can.
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Re: Protecting some Wiring
« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2011, 02:22:59 PM »
Thanks for the wiring protection tips. I will go over my C5 as soon as I can.
Keep in mind that RE continues to improve things on the fly.  You might find less problem with wires than others.  That's what I found when I inspected my C5.  YMMV.
A Royal Enfield owner's cup is always half full.