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Author Topic: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?  (Read 11470 times)

rpnix

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2008, 12:40:13 PM »
So essentially, you illegally put miles on the engine that weren't reflected in the odometer? I'm glad I didn't have yours as my dealer....
Bob Nix -- '06 Ural Tourist, '07 Royal Enfield Electra  <-- Click on the bike to see photos!

Babaganoush

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2008, 01:27:29 AM »
I was looking onto buying my bike at ScooterBob's  http://www.scooterbob.com/  but was put off at first since I read somewhere on his site that he runs the bikes for 100 miles before he turns them over to the customer. I originally wanted to break it in like the Motoman guy does.   http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm  I have since decided it is better for Greg to do what he knows to be best and 100 miles is not excessive. Maybe I can get him to change the oil after 20 or 30 miles like MotoMan says- to get the big chips out.

Dave

ridgerunner

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2008, 01:33:07 AM »
So essentially, you illegally put miles on the engine that weren't reflected in the odometer? I'm glad I didn't have yours as my dealer....

Yup. The shop was quite well known for selling "good bikes" during a time that HD was developing a rep for poor quality. Not only did we sell locally, but we'd ship all over the country and many a famous person got theirs at the shop in time for the local rally. probably the first shop that would pick people up at the airport and let them ride home with no serious problems. That was no longer needed after the AMF days ended and Willie G got the company back and rolled out the Evo line.
08 Bullet ES (AVL)
The Enfield saves on gas, riding the Enfield saves on Prozac. ;)

Kevin Mahoney

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2008, 03:53:18 AM »
Let me add that Scooter Bobs is a dealership that we get very good customer feedback from. He knows what he is doing.

michigandon

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2008, 06:40:29 AM »
Terry Crawford also told me that he puts at least 75 miles or so on the bike himself before he releases it to the customer.

Kevin Mahoney

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2008, 11:43:28 PM »
As is Terri Crawford and Vince. I would buy a Royal Enfield from any one of them with complete confidance.

BanditRE

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2008, 05:08:30 PM »
Terry Crawford brought over my Military about a year ago with around 65 miles on the odometer. But, he also lets them run in his shop with big fans on them for a good period of time before he evens start actually riding them. He knows what he's doing and he's been a good dealer to me.

There are all kinds of horror stories out there about idiots who buy these things and ride them home at 60mph only to find the exhaust has turned blue from the engine to the cat, and then wants the dealer to fix it for free. That ain't right. If you're dumb enough not to know what these bikes need, then you should fix what you screw up.

In the real world, its not always that simple, so dealers (good ones, anyway) are doing some of the intial break in (the most critical) miles before the sale, to offset future problems and expensive fixes.

So to answer Mr Magoo, I'd let the dealer do the break in miles and be assured you have a good bike from the offset. Read the manual, do your homework and don't screw up an otherwise great bike by being impatient. Good luck!
« Last Edit: April 26, 2008, 02:55:55 AM by BanditRE »
2007 Military. It needs some company now the Suzuki has left the stable..........

PaulF

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2008, 05:40:19 PM »
I purchased a 2008 AVL Deluxe this past Thursday, to be delivered this Saturday. My dealer told me he would put about 100 miles on it, then change all the fluids before delivery.

He knows better than me how to break 'em in. I plan on following his advice to the letter.

Kevin Mahoney

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #23 on: May 06, 2008, 06:19:55 PM »
Whoever your dealer is must be a great dealer. I would stick very close to him/her

Kevin Mahoney

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2008, 06:24:01 PM »
PS, Welcome to the family

PaulF

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2008, 07:06:50 PM »
Thanks!

I'll put in a plug for him. Mark of Motorcycle Warehouse in Oxford NJ. Small dealer in a small town. RE expert and one heck of a nice guy.

jonapplegate

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2008, 03:22:05 PM »
I wnat to add my thoughts about that "quick break in procedure that gets bandied about. I would seriously think about waiting to do that until you have had to rering/rebuild. It may very well be a fine alternative on the newest designed bikes but remember that with the enfield in particular, you are not just seating the rings but mating the engine internals as well. Perhaps when you replace the jug and piston you can run those in this way.

Kevin Mahoney

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #27 on: May 14, 2008, 04:44:03 PM »
I just purchased a brand new state of the art GM vehicle and the breaking instructions are not much different that those for the Enfield. Don't go over 55 for 500 miles, don't drive at a steady speed for very long at t time, don't tow for  500 miles, when you do start to tow don't go over 55 for another 500 miles. Common sense.

I am old enough to remember all of the old wives tales about breaking in vehicles. There are a couple of things to remember about these stories. Most emanate from the 1940's-1960's. In the 40's and to some degree the 50's engine blocks would "age harden". in some plants it was common practice to put raw blocks outside to let the weather at them to harden the cast iron. At that time it was state of the art. Over time it only got worse. I have worked on old Ford Flatheads that were so hard that it took out more than one machine tool boring them. Chatter was also a big issue when boring because of the hardness. Then along came chrome rings which were great but were a bit tougher to break in. Most shops has some very fine sand (dust like)  in their arsenal. We would throw a small handful down the carburetor on an engine where the rings were having trouble seating. Crude but effective and not uncommon. It was thought that the quick and rough treatment would help break in rings. Maybe yes, maybe no. It was also a common rumor that if you wanted an engine to be fast you had to drive it like you stole it when brand-new.
  Now roll forward - even the cheapest worst oil available today is vastly superior to what was available back in the day. Materials are much advanced from those day, engineering is vastly improved etc. The stories from back in the day all had a kernel of truth in them, but they just plain don't apply today.
  The last thing you need to worry about is "seating the rings". I have NEVER sold an Enfield where this was an issue and I have sold thousands. What you do need to worry about is the heat generated by a new "stiff" engine. I would say "Drive it like you own it". Be extremely easy on it for the first 500 miles, then easy on it for the next 500. Your bike will last longer and run better in the long run. Running them hard and hot while new will not lead to anything good.

jonapplegate

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2008, 05:26:04 PM »
Drive it like you own it. I like that.

clamp

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Re: dealer wanting to break-in bike ?
« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2008, 06:42:31 AM »
This has made me think. When I chose a bike in the showrooms in India, I refused the one I realy wanted because it had 24 miles on it.  I thought some one might have had it and rejected it for some reason. Instead I chose one with 4 miles on it.

      When I collected it 3 days later after week end it had 27 miles on it like the first one????    I wondered if they also like to put a few on them.

     I believe they dyno them for a while at the factory, not to see HP but just to make sure there is no clonks or banging.
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