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Author Topic: Heated Gear  (Read 494 times)

idk

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Heated Gear
« on: October 15, 2012, 03:51:39 PM »
It is getting to that time of the year when temperatures drop and white stuff starts falling out of the sky. I generally ride all year as long as there isn't snow or ice on the road, but I use  Gerbing heated jacket and gloves on my other bike. Can the electrical system on a G5 handle heated gear?
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Ducati Scotty

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2012, 04:18:04 PM »
These charging systems are not great and vary somewhat between bikes.  Some people have run heated grips or a vest.  On my bike I can't even run a 55W headlight without eating my battery. 

If you want to try it just do it I recommend you also get a voltmeter to make sure you're at least getting 13.5V at cruise.  Also, a battery tender would be a good investment for when it's parked.

Our host sells all you need:
http://nfieldgear.com/enfield-store/aftermarket-parts-accessories/electrical/led-battery-gauge.html
And this:
http://nfieldgear.com/enfield-store/aftermarket-parts-accessories/electrical/supersmart-12v-battery-tender-junior.html

Scott

gremlin

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2012, 05:39:14 PM »
......Can the electrical system ...... handle heated gear?

doubtful.

The unmodified design does not even have a daytime headlight .....  they get an electrical system patch-up before being imported.

Then there is the need to feed the fuel-pump & the engine management system (injector, coil, computer)

I don't know for certain, but, I think you'd be better served using a battery pack in the saddlebag for your heated garment.
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GlennF

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2012, 06:48:32 PM »
People seem to have no trouble here in Australia - however we do not have a "compulsory headlights on" restriction.

Arizoni

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2012, 11:23:52 PM »
Some States in the US also do not have a compulsory headlight on law.

The Department Of Transportation (DOT) is the ones that require the headlight to always be on in order to import the motorcycle to the US.
That's why I removed the jumper wire to make the headlight switch operable.

As for electrical power, my 2011 G5 is running a 40 watt headlight bulb + the other small light bulbs and at speed, the voltage in the electrical system is 14 volts.
It remains at 14 volts at an idle unless I hit the brake lever or pedal. 
That knocks it back to 12 volts at idle speed.

Although I'm guessing, I think with the engine at speed, a 65 watt headlight plus a 20 watt brake light just about maxes out the alternators output.
Jim
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hortoncode3

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2012, 05:40:07 AM »
I'm wondering if someone has come up with an auxiliary generator/alternator design that would run off the chain or side of the tire. I seem to remember that old bicycles had something similar years ago for a headlight. I wonder how many amps are required for even the most basic heated jacket or grips...

Ducati Scotty

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2012, 12:52:45 PM »
Those ride on the wheel at bicycle speeds and put out just enough to power two flashlight batteries.  I don't think it's practical to power high output heated gear at motorcycle speeds.  The unit would be fairly large, the range of speeds would be much greater, and the roller would probably eat the tire sidewall in short order with the pressure required to spin it.

I think the idea of a small deep cycle battery in a saddle bag recharged with a charger in the garage each night is actually a really good one.

Also, I recall some members running heated grips but I believe they also put the bike in a charger at night, so no telling if it was really keeping up or just bleeding slowly enough for the charger to bring it back.

Scott

idk

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2012, 01:23:03 PM »
It sounds pretty much as I expected. Such is life. Maybe I will have to stick to shorter trips on the Enfield over Winter.
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Ducati Scotty

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jartist

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2012, 07:56:06 PM »
You might get by with one heated item between sessions on a trickle charger.  If you already have the gear, plug it in and then use a multimeter to see if it charges when it's revved up.  A jacket or vest would keep you're core warm.  It seems that below about 40 deg F I can't pile enough stuff on to keep my core warm, there just isn't enough heat from metabolism to do the job at motorcycle speeds.  If you have a heated vest to warm up your core you can get by with bundling up the other parts.  Or just stop for warm apple pie and coffee often.

Tri750

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2012, 09:46:47 PM »
Gerbing has battery packs available for their stuff.
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GlennF

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2012, 10:13:47 PM »
I just had a quick google around and found this chart from one of the heated gear manufacturers.



Seems to me a UCE Enfield with headlights on might cope with the gloves especially if you avoided lugging the engine ... but the vest would be pushing the friendship. Lights off you would do OK.

If you replaced the running lights and instruments lights with LED units and fitted a lower wattage headlight you would pick up a bit of leeway. LED lights save about 12 watts and a lower wattage low beam might save another 20 watts or so.

No way could you run the full kit, gloves chaps coat etc all at once.

motorat

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Re: Heated Gear
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2012, 10:00:34 AM »
this was in my email today.
http://www.motorcyclegear.com/street/heated_gear_and_snow_helmets/all_types/mobile_warming/?utm_source=Promo%3A++Mobile+Warming+Battery+Powered+Heated+Gear&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_medium=email

i think battery heat is the way to go on the re.
for me i'll stick to the suzuki on the cold days as i have heated grips-winshield-hand guards and enought wats to power a vest
Joe
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