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Author Topic: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor  (Read 1802 times)

ace.cafe

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ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« on: January 12, 2013, 12:42:02 PM »
Can anyone tell me what pins on the ECU are assigned to to O2 sensor for each wire from the O2 sensor that might go to the ECU?

Or if that's difficult, perhaps a couple of snapshots that show the connector with the wire color codes that go to the O2 sensor?

I'm working on getting this ECU under control.

Thanks in advance.

singhg5

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2013, 04:28:04 PM »
ECU pin number 7 and 17 are connected to Oxygen Sensor.
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ace.cafe

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2013, 04:36:41 PM »
ECU pin number 7 and 17 are connected to Oxygen Sensor.

Thank you very much Mr Singh!
I trust you are well?

Would it be too much to ask if you know which color wire went to each pin?
This would be of great help.

singhg5

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2013, 04:44:14 PM »
Thank you very much Mr Singh!
I trust you are well?
Would it be too much to ask if you know which color wire went to each pin?
This would be of great help.
Doing OK. Thanks.

I will try to find that out, when I go to see my bike which is in storage room for winter.


« Last Edit: January 12, 2013, 05:03:27 PM by singhg5 »
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mattsz

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2013, 05:50:10 PM »
ECU pin number 7 and 17 are connected to Oxygen Sensor.

Maybe not relevant to your needs, but...

7 and 17 are unique to the 02 sensor.  My diagram also shows two other wires from the 02 sensor.  One joins other sensors to connect to pin 24 (a black wire, according to the diagram).  The other looks like it gets power from the battery, and also connects to pin 1.  I'm guessing these are power and ground?

ace.cafe

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2013, 06:01:58 PM »
Maybe not relevant to your needs, but...

7 and 17 are unique to the 02 sensor.  My diagram also shows two other wires from the 02 sensor.  One joins other sensors to connect to pin 24 (a black wire, according to the diagram).  The other looks like it gets power from the battery, and also connects to pin 1.  I'm guessing these are power and ground?

Matt,
VERY relevant.
I needed that too.
Thank you!

You guys are AWESOME!
You have no idea how much that helped me out!
And this will make some progress toward the goal!
« Last Edit: January 12, 2013, 06:11:10 PM by ace.cafe »

singhg5

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2013, 04:33:47 AM »
Here is a picture of the wires from the oxygen sensor. 

It has four wires - one white and one black for power and ground ??  Perhaps 2 sensor wires are white and grey ??  COLOR CODING SUBJECT TO VERIFICATION AND CONFIRMATION.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 02:47:43 PM by singhg5 »
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ace.cafe

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2013, 11:18:12 AM »
Here is a picture of the wires from the oxygen sensor. 

It has four wires - one white and one black for power and ground, respectively.  The 2 sensor wires are white and grey.

Awesome!
Thank you, SinghG5!
I would surmise from that photo that the two white wires are the heater for the O2 sensor, and the black and gray wires are for the sensor itself.

Very helpful info.
Thank you for your help, SinghG5 !

mattsz

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2013, 11:33:04 AM »
Assuming the wire color stays the same on both sides of the harness connector(s)?  I wish I could get to my bike to check out the rest of the wiring, but everything is packed away...

singhg5

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2013, 12:35:47 PM »
Awesome!
Thank you, SinghG5!
I would surmise from that photo that the two white wires are the heater for the O2 sensor, and the black and gray wires are for the sensor itself.

Very helpful info.
Thank you for your help, SinghG5 !

After I had posted, I remembered that RE wiring color scheme does not always match with the circuit diagram.

The wires can be different colors at the coupler, on their way from one place to the other.

It is advisable to confirm which wire is which by actual testing. 
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ace.cafe

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2013, 12:37:43 PM »
It's always good to check that the wiring goes where it should.

However, it is a common thing with O2 sensors that the wires which are of the same color go to the heater.

singhg5

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2013, 02:44:09 PM »
Tom, Following is the ECU pin configuration for its sensors - in case you need it in future.
 
NOTE - ONE OF THE PINS LABELLING HAS BEEN CORRECTED IN LATER VERSION OF THIS PHOTO - SEE A FEW POSTS BELOW THIS ONE.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2013, 04:49:33 AM by singhg5 »
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mattsz

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2013, 02:57:35 PM »
What the heck is the"k-line" device?  It's got +12v from the battery, ground, and one wire into the ECU...

And on the lower left: a diode?  Why doesn't the other end connect to anything?  The ECU pin is labeled "SG"...  ??

JVS

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2013, 03:54:32 PM »
According to http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/motorbikes/73998-royal-enfield-500-classic-thread-62.html#post2157100

K-line = 'the connector used for connecting the ECU to computer or code reader.'

And according to the legend provided in the wiring diagram, that SG triangle is a 'Sensor ground', not a diode?  ??? Not sure. Gremlin will help us here :D
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mattsz

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2013, 04:12:22 PM »
I wonder which one is the wire you ground to display the blinking fault codes?

1 Thump

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2013, 04:40:07 PM »
Is this board awesome or what ?

gremlin

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2013, 06:13:47 PM »
And on the lower left: a diode?  Why doesn't the other end connect to anything?  The ECU pin is labeled "SG"...  ??

That circuit is the sensor ground circuit.

It's main function is to provide a common reference for reading the sensor(s) output voltage(s)/current(s)

The actual frame ground of a vehicle is noisy as hell, this circuit acts as a quiet local ground field that collects all the sensors and brings them to the ECU, before connecting them to the chassis.
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singhg5

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2013, 04:41:33 AM »
In the previous photo of ECU circuit, the inverted triangle looked like an electrical symbol for a diode and I had penciled as such. 

Thanks to JVS and Gremlin who corrected that to be 'Surface Sensor Ground Circuit' - though I do not fully understand that thing.

Below is the revised version of the ECU circuit - hopefully the labelling is more readable and correct.
 
Surface ground should read SENSOR ground in the diagram, prepared by my tired brain at midnight on the topic I know little  ;)
« Last Edit: January 16, 2013, 03:31:06 AM by singhg5 »
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gremlin

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2013, 07:34:54 PM »
SENSOR ground  (aka sensor return) or signal ground.
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singhg5

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2013, 03:18:44 AM »
SENSOR ground  (aka sensor return) or signal ground.

'Sensor Ground' it is Now ! In its 3rd revision  :).

While we are at this topic,  can you explain a bit more. 

If the 'sensor ground' wire is not attached to frame, where is it attached ? Is it the ECU pin 24 that act as 'sensor ground' ? If so, how does it act as ground ?

Also, it seems that 4 sensors - throttle position sensor, air manifold pressure sensor, engine temperature sensor and O2 sensor - are part of this 'sensor ground circuit'. 

How does this grounding provide common reference for sensor output and perhaps reduce background electrical 'noise' or variation from sensor to sensor for more accurate reading ?
 
« Last Edit: January 16, 2013, 04:56:30 AM by singhg5 »
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gremlin

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2013, 01:25:26 PM »
First, let me preface this discussion by saying that I KNOW NOTHING specific to the bullet.  The knowledge I am drawing on for this discussion is standard engineering school fodder.

:Having said that:

The signal ground is connect to the frame ground, however, that connection is via a relatively high inductance path.  - Imagine how Lake Superior is connected to the Atlantic Ocean......   generally speaking, the surface disturbances of the Ocean do not find their way up the chain to Lake Superior - However - they are interconnected !
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GreenMachine

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Re: ECU pin assignments for O2 sensor
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2013, 03:56:22 PM »
Gremlin: As u r aware, the best ground potential is earth and in some cases that requires a bit of engineering, chemicals, using a megger, etc to reach a given potential to satisfy the  requirement needed. Grounds are a antenna and radiate if the end point isn't tied to a lesser potential (chassis) . .I would think a standard motorcycle or auto has a bit of noise when viewing the Grounding with a anaylzer...Either way, it's the standard that's been in play for quite a while. It works, cost effective and fairly easy to fix.    Excessive vibration doesn't help our cause.
..I did enjoy your analogy by the way..GM
Oh Magoo you done it again