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Author Topic: How to start right  (Read 2612 times)

Keith42

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How to start right
« on: July 30, 2007, 04:40:08 PM »
just wanted to post a general question ie...what is the best advice anyone can offer me being new to the enfield, useful tips? advice? maintenance suggestions? any comments would be helpful
old school young fool

RagMan

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Re: How to start right
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2007, 04:57:28 PM »
Check everything, every time you intend to ride - tires, oil, gas, nuts and bolts, mirrors, seat...  If you get into the habit of checking your modern antique, it will not let you down.  Every failure of these machines lets you know before it happens - you just have to look for it.

When you first get it, break it in gently - don't race it, don't over rev it, don't stand idling for a long time. just ride it slowly, and carefully. Vary the speeds so you are not keeping the same revs.  IT will be a bit stiff until it all settles in.

If you take care of the first 500 miles, you will have a bike that lasts a long time.
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

Emmet

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Re: How to start right
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2007, 06:05:52 PM »
Ride like you're completely invisible, and have no brakes.
Ride like it really is a '58, and there's no spare parts available this side of McMurdo Sound at midsummer.
Once a week, ride on reserve, so grok doesn't accumulate in the tank.
Ride every week, so grok doesn't accumulate in your jets.
Install a fuel filter.
Clean, high-grade oils. Frequently.
Dress for the fall, not for the ride.
Don't fry bacon naked.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2007, 06:14:31 PM by Emmet »

rpnix

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Re: How to start right
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2007, 06:14:26 PM »
If you're new to riding et.al., or you haven't done so in the past, sign up for your local Basic Riding Course. Minnesota offers one, and I think a lot of other states do as well. Brand new rider or seasoned vet, you're sure to learn something that you'll be able to apply to your daily riding.

As said above, check things each time you ride. Things come loose on the best of bikes. When tightening things up, blue loctite is your friend. It'll give it just a little stronger hold than tightening alone, but won't take a gorilla to get it apart again.

Track your mileage, at least at the beginning if not long term. It will tell you what your range per tank is, allowing you to predict when you need to gas up, rather than relying on the bike's reserve. It can also warn you when you have a developing problem. You'll notice a drop in mileage, possibly, before you actually see or hear any other symptoms.

Find a local group (or groups) you can ride with. Scheduled trips and events will give you an excuse to get out on the bike, and will put you in touch with others with similar interests and with experiences you can learn from.

Don't over-drive your abilities. Slow down for that tight turn on the way to work and get a feel for it, then increase your speed over time, until you're comfortable going 'round it at higher speeds. "Grow" your abilities, rather than trying to ride like a pro right out of the gate. Scraped pegs may be the sign of a vet, but you needn't try to get there the first week.

Just pay attention to what the bike is trying to tell you, and you'll share a long friendship. Good luck!
Bob Nix -- '06 Ural Tourist, '07 Royal Enfield Electra  <-- Click on the bike to see photos!

Keith42

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Re: How to start right
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2007, 11:43:05 AM »
thanks for the comments gentlemen, all very sound advice. Especially tambaypiper the bacon bit is useful (as i'm a chef) on a serious note though my 'modern antique' has about four thousand miles on it, last oil change was two months ago by the previous owner. what kind of preventattive maintenance can i do to make my 'piece of history' last until its a real antique?
old school young fool

Thumper

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Re: How to start right
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2007, 04:37:10 PM »
thanks for the comments gentlemen, all very sound advice. Especially tambaypiper the bacon bit is useful (as i'm a chef) on a serious note though my 'modern antique' has about four thousand miles on it, last oil change was two months ago by the previous owner. what kind of preventattive maintenance can i do to make my 'piece of history' last until its a real antique?

1) Lubricate cables: Throttle, clutch, brake, speedo. Then examine cables for correct slack and overall condition.

2) Clean and oil air filter or replace.

3) Lubricate footpeg hinges, shift lever shaft, kick start lever hinge.

4) Clean petcock and screen. Replace fuel filter. Examine fuel line.

5) Examine rubber carb manifold

6) Check steering head bearings.

7) Check drive chain tension and rear sprocket condition

8.) Check and/or replace spark plug. Armor-all ignition wires then plastic caps and rubber boots inside and out.

9) Change engine oil and filter

10) Change gearbox oil at specified intervals (allow 24 hrs to dry drain plug if using locktite)

11) Change primary oil at specified intervals

12) Wheel bearings: With wheels up off ground check bearings for side-to-side wiggle and drag.

13) Examine swing arm condition and drive chain adjusters

14) Adjust brakes as needed. Grease pivot points (cam area) and return springs as needed. Lube any brake linkage that hasnít already been done; examine pads, disc, fluid, hydraulic line, hub, and drum; clean off brake dust

15) With the wheels up off the ground, check and adjust spoke tension

16) Torque head according to factory specs.

17) Adjust valves according to factory specs

18) Dress all rubber and vinyl

19) Check all fasteners for tightness (electrical connections, oil bango bolts, lock washers for breakage, exhaust brackets)

20) Check tire pressure tires

Matt
« Last Edit: August 03, 2007, 11:01:15 PM by Thumper »

RagMan

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Re: How to start right
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2007, 04:01:02 AM »
That is a really good list, Matt, I would like to copy it, print it out and hang it on the workshop wall..
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

justin_o_guy

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Re: How to start right
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2007, 04:34:41 AM »
I don't much care for Armorall. It's good stuff, but, if you can go to a copier repair shop & ask for a pint of fuser oil, it is 100% silicone oil. No alcohol to evaporate out. That pint will last longer than 5 bottles of armor all & do a better job. The fuser oil is being phased out so hurry. It is hardersince the oil is thicker, but with a little elbow grease it spreads evenly & lasts lots longer. I think I should start shopping for a refill, now that I mention it. If they ask what brand, Minolta fuser oil works fine.

Keith42

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Re: How to start right
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2007, 02:35:53 AM »
amazing and exactly what i was looking for thanks. i am going to start on that right away and let you guys know how it goes.  ;)
old school young fool