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Author Topic: My Royal Enfield  (Read 2608 times)

jedaks

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #45 on: July 07, 2013, 06:04:58 PM »
Yeah I was hoping to replace the exhaust for the shorter version but my budget has had to be spent on other things :)

I have heard about drilling out the core of the bazooka muffler and just having it straight through. Maybe others can advise otherwise but it could be a cheap way to get some performance without spending much money.

High On Octane

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #46 on: July 07, 2013, 07:46:12 PM »
I have heard about drilling out the core of the bazooka muffler and just having it straight through. Maybe others can advise otherwise but it could be a cheap way to get some performance without spending much money.


That could improve the performance some, but it's still going to weigh 1800 pounds.  Roughly.  ;)

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young gun

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #47 on: July 07, 2013, 11:15:25 PM »
I would rather just wait and do it properly. I've looked up the drilling and modding the original pipe but its messy and in my opinion spoils the looks once its done. To each his own but I'd rather just wait till budget allows ;)

young gun

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #48 on: December 01, 2013, 10:40:21 AM »
Been a bit quiet on the board but I've had a rollercoaster of a year. So apologies but it is what it is :)

I've had some fun with the bike lately. The vibrations have managed to break my rear exhaust bracket, front and center mudguard stay and my license disc holder. To be fair I have a feeling I purchased the bike with the center stay on the mudguard already broken because now that I've purchased more substantional center stays from Hitchcocks, the mudguard barely vibrates at all. I've replaced a the parts and at the same time decided to buy some extras, new grommets etc.

Anyways that's not what the post is about. About a week ago I heard a different racket coming from the top of the motor and I assumed that it was the valve pushrods that needed to be adjusted. So I warmed the bike up and set the bike at TDC, took off the inspection cover and found the inlet pushrod adjuster was tight and the exhaust spun freely albeit with a slight bit of play. A bit concerned since I knew that both adjuster should spin freely, I pulled down the kick start down to turn the engine and then I found the opposite to happen? The inlet spun freely and the exhaust was tight? Now I get why this is happening, obviously pushrods are under pressure at certain parts of the 4 stroke cycle. So I set the pushrod adjusters to eliminate play but only when I could get them to spin freely i.e. Not at TDC. Is this ok?! I rode the bike and the clatter is gone so I'm assuming it's fine but I would like to check to be sure as this procedure doesn't match the Snidal manual or some of the vids I've seen on youtube.

Here's a new pic of the bike as well :)

« Last Edit: December 01, 2013, 10:49:31 AM by young gun »

ERC

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #49 on: December 01, 2013, 11:14:00 AM »
Unless you have a wierd cam or somethings amiss. they should both be loose at TDC.   ERC
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Blltrdr

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #50 on: December 01, 2013, 11:14:33 AM »
Since you have the Snidal manual you can try checking the valves with the motor running as he explains in the valve adjustment chapter. This will give you the answer you are looking for.
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Chuck D

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #51 on: December 01, 2013, 11:21:22 AM »
Hey Young Gun,
You need to set the valve lash with the piston at TDC on the compression stroke. That is, with both valves closed. This means that the lifters directly below the push rod adjusters will BOTH be at their lowest points. You can observe this for yourself as you are kicking through. So if you picture this, the lifters below are exerting very little upward pressure on the push rod and the top of the push rod is resting only lightly against the rocker arm up above.
This is, with a cold engine, when you do your checking and or adjusting.
You want there to be no discernable up and down play while still being able to turn the push rod (not necessarily "spin") with your thumb and index finger. Sometimes it takes a couple of tries.
By the way I find it helpful to take out the center cover stud when I do this.
If you did this correctly, the valve train IS SUPPOSED TO CLATTER! That is in its nature. I'd start worrying when things got to quiet!
Hope this helps.
Chuck.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2013, 11:24:35 AM by Chuck D »
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AgentX

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #52 on: December 01, 2013, 11:38:14 AM »
Ace recommends setting the valves with the engine stone-cold.  His reasoning, as I recall, is that setting the valves warm will result in dangerous tightness when the engine is cold.

I know the idea of a warm engine is to set the valves under the same conditions under which the engine will run, but I trust Ace's instructions above all others.  And it makes sense to me that if the bike has to warm up every time you start it, you're abusing the hell out of your valves until they get to operating temp if they're not set to be properly adjusted when cold.  No bueno.

ace.cafe

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #53 on: December 01, 2013, 11:53:06 AM »
The correct way to adjust the valve lash is with a cold engine at TDC on the compression stroke.

 The reason is the engine is designed to run with .012" hot lash, and it "grows" to this lash as the engine warms up and the lash clearance expands. If you adjust lash hot, then it's too tight when cold, and it holds the valves off the seats until the engine warms up. This burns the valves.

This is why the manual says to do it cold.
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young gun

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Re: My Royal Enfield
« Reply #54 on: December 01, 2013, 12:42:41 PM »
Ok just checked it cold and it's perfect, well to my untrained eyes at least :)

Thanks Chuck D for  the TDC explanation, it's exactly what I needed to know :) thanks guys!
« Last Edit: December 01, 2013, 12:49:41 PM by young gun »