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Author Topic: Newbie Intro  (Read 2483 times)

Arizoni

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2013, 05:20:06 AM »
That sounds like a better deal, but only if the Military recognize and accept it.

The Military often doesn't work in a logical manner when common sense is needed.
Jim
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mattsz

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #31 on: March 25, 2013, 10:44:14 AM »
Am i missing something?

I don't know. The course I took ran two days, and included classroom time and riding time - on a specially painted closed course, and on bikes that they provided. At the end, if you passed both the written and practical riding portion, you walk into the Maine DMV and walk out with your motorcycle license.

Is this what is offered by the Illinois $25 class?

benknrobbers

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #32 on: March 25, 2013, 11:50:03 AM »
I know its beating a dying horse, but... the cost of 200-300 for the course just doesnt ring correct. 
My state, Illinois, is done through mostly education orgs.  Cost about 25.  A quick google search for Louisiana, i found this: http://www.lsp.org/motorcycle.html

I wish I was still in Louisiana, a lot of this would be easier, they tend to run classes earlier and later, and it's not as hard to get in. I have the good fortune to be stationed in Missouri now. Not actually a bad place, but the cheapest class that I can find within reasonable distance is $200. I even took a page out of your book, and googled the MO DOT and tried through that. I thank everyone for the suggestions, but it looks like I'm just going to have to be patient. No worries. I guess I just needed to vent a little frustration out really. I'll spend the extra time getting some of the small projects done that I wouldn't have done if I had the opportunity to go out and ride.

On a related but amusing note I was reading the AF regulation that governs the Motorcycle program, and found out that if I had a sidecar I wouldn't require the MSF for some reason. Kinda gave me a chuckle. almost wish I would've ordered one to go with the bike now. Mount a replica SAW on the sidecar and get one of my buddies to ride to work with me.
Always prepare for the worst and your surprises will always be pleasant ones.

DanB

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #33 on: March 25, 2013, 12:07:11 PM »
Quote
I don't know. The course I took ran two days, and included classroom time and riding time - on a specially painted closed course, and on bikes that they provided. At the end, if you passed both the written and practical riding portion, you walk into the Maine DMV and walk out with your motorcycle license.

Is this what is offered by the Illinois $25 class?

Yes the very same. I just walked on one Friday evening. Done at a community college. Great course and saw more drops than a motocross. Not everyone passed.
Suppose I were an idiot, and suppose I were a member of Congress; but I repeat myself. ... Mark Twain
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gremlin

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #34 on: March 25, 2013, 12:55:54 PM »
............ I was reading the AF regulation that governs the Motorcycle program, and found out that if I had a sidecar I wouldn't require the MSF for some reason...............

I've had a hack, you don't ride them .... you drive them.   Wickedly dangerous.  Darwin would approve.
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1981 XS11 streetfighter
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1969 CB450
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mattsz

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #35 on: March 25, 2013, 12:57:24 PM »
Lucky you! Here in Maine it's private enterprise, no state (or other) subsidy...

benknrobbers

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #36 on: March 25, 2013, 02:18:40 PM »
Lucky you! Here in Maine it's private enterprise, no state (or other) subsidy...
I think that may be the difference here as well.
Always prepare for the worst and your surprises will always be pleasant ones.

mattsz

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #37 on: March 25, 2013, 05:53:26 PM »
When I was bike shopping in NH (where I test-rode, and fell in love with, a C5 {http://www.nationalpowersports.net/RoyalEnfield.aspx}), I stopped by a Suzuki dealer that had a pile of TU-250's in stock, all lined up - and all sold... to a local high school district that ordered them for their motorcycle training classes!  Nothing like that available anywhere I've ever lived!

They didn't want to put any miles on them, but did let me ride one around the parking lot.  It was quiet and smooth and fun - and I didn't buy one.  But what a great bike for the MSF course!



The outfit that gave my class ran, almost exclusively, Honda Rebels - yuck!  A cruiser bike with your feet way out in front of you is no way to learn to ride, if you ask me, which you didn't.  Fortunately, they had a couple of KLR or some other such dual-sport bikes that were taller, so they put me on one instead (unfortunately, it was a terrible fit for me, and it wouldn't run worth a damn, but that's another story)...

barenekd

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #38 on: March 25, 2013, 06:06:06 PM »
In CA, the MSF courses are over $150. It was $150 the last time I checked and that's been a few years ago. I was considering becoming an instructor, but  they want a lot of preliminary tasks to get there, so I opted out.
They supply the bikes and teach classes in appropriate parking lots around the area.  I think it's two nights of classroom and two days riding.
Bare
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Rich Mintz

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #39 on: March 25, 2013, 08:11:55 PM »
I have no sympathy -- I had to pay $350 for the basic MSF course here in New York City! But everything's more expensive here. Course is run by a private driving school, but they issue the MSF certification when you pass and NY State accepts it as a waiver of the road test. For whatever it's worth, the instructor was not gentle -- everyone passed, but he was quite rough on us. He wanted us to actually learn the basic lessons of handling and control before he gave us that little card.

barenekd

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #40 on: March 25, 2013, 08:49:50 PM »
Gee, an instructor with integrity!
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benknrobbers

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #41 on: March 26, 2013, 03:30:55 AM »
The first time I took the class it was Honda Rebels. I had been riding a Magna for a while so the form factor of the bike was about the same so it was comfortable for me. The instructor for my class was a drag racer. The class was enjoyable, but definitely put me out of my comfort zone. Controlled skids, fast reaction maneuvering around the instructor and his partner (guy who was studying to be an instructor himself). I think the one that put me in the highest clench factor was when we had 10 people doing one figure 8, and I was one of three of them who had ever been on a motorcycle at all. I kept thinking I was going to die doing 15 miles an hour in a parking lot.

As far as the motorcycle safety course taking place of the test, in Louisiana it would have I believe but I hadn't gotten the course when I got the license. A week before I took my test I went to the DMV and tried to get a motorcycle permit. They don't issue permits in LA, so I ask how to practice legally and get the bike to the DMV for the test. The lady there told me to stay off of main roads when I was practicing, and that if I felt like I could pass the test to drive to the DMV.When I get there a week later the same lady handed me the written test, and when she took my answer sheet she asked how I got there. I told her I drove and she responded with "We want to go to lunch early and since you obviously got here in one piece we are going to waive the driving portion."
Always prepare for the worst and your surprises will always be pleasant ones.

mattsz

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #42 on: March 26, 2013, 12:00:36 PM »
...she asked how I got there. I told her I drove and she responded with "We want to go to lunch early and since you obviously got here in one piece we are going to waive the driving portion."

Gee, a state employee with integrity!

kammersangerin

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #43 on: March 26, 2013, 01:25:15 PM »
The MSF in Virginia depends on where you take it. It is separately run, but usually using a municipal or state property. The one I first took 20 some years ago did not get you your license but it prepared you. And it really did. I still had to do my exam. And, for my part, I forgot to check off the right box at some point after I stopped riding for a long time, and I had to retake it to get my endorsement back. It was kind of tricky.

I am not sure I would say yuck about the Rebel. It's a great bike and it fits me beautifully. You can also carry a good bit of stuff on it, unlike the S40. I almost bought one again. I just couldn't put up with the cold natured ride. I also looked at the TU250, because it is fuel injected, and..again, it's too tall. Not as tall as the C5, but had I thought more carefully about shock tension, I would have bought one, or simply swapped the shocks on the Vespa. The Vespa still had plenty of clearance.

barenekd

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Re: Newbie Intro
« Reply #44 on: March 26, 2013, 06:10:28 PM »
Quote
he asked how I got there. I told her I drove and she responded with "We want to go to lunch early and since you obviously got here in one piece we are going to waive the driving portion."

Now that's funny!
Having been riding and racing for twenty years before I had to get a license, I kinda thought driving through a keyhole shaped slalom course was a bit ridiculous. I'm don't think I was ever I was situation to have to maneuver through something like that. For what it's worth I got my CA license on a Yamaha SR500. Woud've felt better on a Bultaco Sherpa T! This was long before MSF courses.
Bare
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