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December 22, 2014, 01:32:03 AM

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Author Topic: Sudden loss of power (and: reflections on being stranded by the side of the road  (Read 2469 times)

Rich Mintz

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Re: Sudden loss of power (and: reflections on being stranded by the road)
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2013, 04:54:55 PM »
Resolution:

- My dealer has the bike but they say they're backed up and can't look at it for two weeks (!)

- Bike now starts up fine, no evidence that there was ever a problem

- It does appear that the side stand or rollover kill switch is to blame

- If arguing with the dealer doesn't get them to attend to it, I'll go pick up the bike and deal with the kill switch myself. It's not the kind of repair I've ever done, but I'm a smart grownup with a screwdriver and a roll of electrical tape and will be able to figure it out. I'm sure there are instructions somewhere on this forum.

Some parting thoughts:

(1) GEICO Emergency Road Service ($14/year as part of my policy) absolutely delivered. They had a professional motorcycle rescue truck (with a hydraulic lift) to my location 15 minutes after I hung up the phone. Sure, I was lucky that I broke down near Annapolis, a very motorcycle-friendly place, but still.  I might not even bother to put in for reimbursement for the $120 I was charged for towing and a set of 4 new straps (see below) -- just knowing GEICO answers the phone is enough.

(2) Being rescued by a professional motorcycle tow driver (as opposed to car tow) made all the difference. The guy knew about bikes, understood my concerns, and spent 90 minutes with me getting me to a resolution. He was just not going to leave me alone until it was clear what my plan was to get the bike home and he saw me off safely.

(3) Fie on all the dealers who won't touch a Royal Enfield. I'm talking to you, Pete's of Severna Park and Chesapeake Cycles of Annapolis.

(4) Incredibly, you can rent a moving truck on the spur of the moment for a 250-mile one-way trip, and this is perfectly normal. It wasn't nearly as expensive as I expected ($120 plus taxes/insurance/gas for 2 days, although I returned the truck on the other end 7 hours after I picked it up).

(5) I'm capable of transporting a motorcycle a long distance in a truck without tipping it over or setting anything on fire. This may sound minor but I do not come from a "drive around with ATVs in the back of the truck" culture at all (my family thinks I am crazy to go near a motorcycle, and I'm pretty sure no blood relative of mine has ever owned a pickup truck or van). The rescue driver provided 4 new ratchet straps, helped me tie down the bike, and even taught me a little about physics. The bike didn't move ONE INCH during a 250-mile trip in a rattletrap rental truck, and I got the bike out of the van myself on the other end (at midnight on a deserted street in Brooklyn) with no trouble.

(6) Owning a motorcycle with almost no dealer network is not for everybody. I can handle it because I'm not afraid of a bit of adventure, but if i were a different person, this one experience would drive me to sell the bike and trade it in for a Honda or Suzuki, with dealers easy to find across the country.

(7) What do you mean, "we're backed up and we'll look at your bike in 2 weeks"? I bought locally for a reason: I expected you would service what you sell. (The jury is still out on this one -- we'll see what they say when I show up in person.)

(8) There's 24-hour moving-truck rental in downtown Brooklyn (!). I don't know who would ever need a rental truck at 2 in the morning, but if I ever do, I know I can get one.

Ducati Scotty

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If you don't mind not having the side stand safety switch, just follow the wire from it a few inches and disconnect it.  Many of us already have.  If you're at all handy you should be able to open it and repair it.

Scott

High On Octane

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What a bummer.  For what it's worth, from what you're describing and from what I've read in other posts, it does sound like the kickstand and/or rollover switch is to blame.  Both are easy fixes and shouldn't take more than a half hour and a beer to rectify.  Quite honestly, if you subtracted the beer from the equation you could do it right there in the parking lot.

It's good to hear that there are still some good tow truck drivers out there.  Most of those guys are just out to take your money any way they can.

Scottie
Scottie J  ~  Bulldog Kustoms Denver  ~  1958 Enfield/Indian Trailblazer  ~  1959 Enfield/Indian Chief

Ekatus Atimoss

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Hi,
This sounds a bit like what has seized my friend's 2010 C5 - bought 2012 from the dealer showroom. Very early, it started to blow the main fuse, we were running very quickly out of stock of these 20A - root cause was a faulty parking light socket, causing a short upon the slightest movement. We disassembled the parking light as a first aid and got a revised socket by RE. Next possible culprit could be indeed the side stand switch.

Maybe this could help.

Kind regards
Michael
dopo notte, atra e funesta, splende in ciel più vago il sole e di gioia empie la terra
2012 C5 built for comfort, not for speed (click for pictures)

Rich Mintz

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Michael, I have exactly the same bike (2010 C5 bought new in 2012).

Thank you. We did pull out and (visually) check all the fuses yesterday afternoon, including the main fuse (I have the manual so I can tell which fuse is which).

Since my electrical power has now come back on, it means my fuse is not the problem, right? Not challenging, just making sure I understand the logic of how to trace the problem.

What I am now guessing is that I have two problems:

(1) I have a faulty rollover sensor

(2) I *may* also have a faulty sidestand switch

First thing to check is whether my rollover sensor has come loose. This weekend I'll figure out how to take my seat apart and get under there. :-)

no bs

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for what it's worth, my 2011 g5 taillight wires rubbed on the fender hole(where the grommet had fallen out) and i lost all power. something to consider. good luck!
killing bugs since 1972 2011 g5 deluxe


Ducati Scotty

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Don't cut anything.  Go to the sidestand, follow the wire that goes up from it.  Within a foot of the switch is a connector.  Unplug the connector and your sidestand switch is disabled and won't cause any trouble.

Scott

b.sheets

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Don't cut anything.  Go to the sidestand, follow the wire that goes up from it.  Within a foot of the switch is a connector.  Unplug the connector and your sidestand switch is disabled and won't cause any trouble.

Scott

+1

no need for cutting
2012 C5 Special(SOLD)
2013 Triumph Thruxton

Rich Mintz

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Thanks Scott - I've now established that the side stand isn't my problem. :)

I'm looking in and near the left toolbox for loose connectors. There is a small square connector ( on a wire in the bundle above the battery) that's loose. Trying to figure out what it may have popped out of.


Arizoni

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+2

Even if the correct wire was cut, and there is a chance of the wrong one becoming the victim,  cutting the wire will leave the bare ends of the two wires sitting right next to one another.
In that position, the bare wires, being the devious things they are, could make contact with one another causing the computer to think the switch had closed. :(
Jim
2011 G5 Deluxe
1999 Miata 10th Anniversary


gashousegorilla

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Thanks Scott - I've now established that the side stand isn't my problem. :)

I'm looking in and near the left toolbox for loose connectors. There is a small square connector ( on a wire in the bundle above the battery) that's loose. Trying to figure out what it may have popped out of.

   If that wire is Black and the only wire in the connector..... It's the ground for the ECU. Find the other end and plug it in ! And you should be good. The bike won't run.... or start without it.

 If it's a three wire, in a unplugged , white square connector. That's probably just the diagnostic hook up, and not used.
An thaibhsí atá rattling ag an doras agus tá sé an diabhal sa chathaoir.

Ducati Scotty

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Common areas for shorts and loose connections are at the tail light, near the left tool box, where the wiring harness crosses the top engine brace (near the front of the seat, the brace is usually gold), in the front nacelle and around the steeing head.  Also, the ignition switch is not the most high quality.  Jiggle the key and turn it on and off a few times while monitoring the voltage on the bike.

Scott