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Author Topic: How to adjust timing?  (Read 1806 times)

316CMH

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How to adjust timing?
« on: November 25, 2013, 10:05:11 PM »
Can't seem to find anything on exactly how to do this.  I found a video on youtube but there's no sound.  I also looked here but can't find a step by step that's simple enough for me.

Thanks

ERC

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2013, 10:50:39 PM »
On what motor?   ERC
2-57 Apaches, 2-57 Trailblazers, 60 Chief, 65 Interceptor, 2004 Bullet, 612 Bullet chopped.

316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2013, 10:54:33 PM »
500, It's an '04 Bullet Classic.  My first Royal, bought it for my son as a Christmas present/project bike. Just want it running when I give it to him.

ERC

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2013, 10:56:29 PM »
I see from another thread what you have. Go to Hitchcocks.The site on the left will have tecnical notes click that and you'll see how to time your motor step by step. Real easy.  ERC
2-57 Apaches, 2-57 Trailblazers, 60 Chief, 65 Interceptor, 2004 Bullet, 612 Bullet chopped.

316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2013, 10:58:43 PM »
Thanks! I'll check it out.

coolgoose2

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2013, 12:31:35 PM »
Hi.

Here is how I do it..I am from Kerala, India and I ride a 2009 model 350 with CB ignition.

Tools for Ignition timing setting:

1. TDC tool from Nfield gear; you can do with a hollowed out spark plug(don't strip the thread) and a metal rod; however see to it that it does not fall into the cylinder(you can use an allen key)

2. a 12V lamp connected to crocodile clips. One end to the points nut and second to chassis(ground). This is to check the exact moment of parting of points. Point are connected to ''primary'' of the ignition coil and the temporary disconnection of the primary circuit will disrupt the magnetic field and thereby induce a potential difference in the ''secondary'' which is connected to spark plug. the wiring in the primary and secondary of the coil will determine the strength of the spark. Traditional mechanics use their eye to see the parting of points, but I feel that electrical separation of points occur before it could be detected by eye. Electrical separation can be established correctly by a electrical circuit with a lamp

3. no-8 tubular spanner; to loosen and tighten the nuts of the points back plate...

4. lens/torch to see whether there is any pitting of points. check when they are at max gap. I deliberately did not check the gap with the feeler gauge this time as I had done it last time (one week back)and found to be correct.

5.plug wrench/screw driver

 HOW: The theory on static timing adjustment dictate that spark should occur 0.8mm before top dead center (TDC) in compression stroke... So that is the aim of this experiment

1. put the bike in neutral gear and kick till compression prevents the piston from going down. the gently pull de-compression lever and push the kicker down by a couple of inches and watch for the ammeter to flick back to zero. Piston is reasonably near top dead center(TDC) in compression stroke.

2. Put the bike in fourth gear by pulling up the neutral lever and rotating the rear wheel at the same time. Now the piston movement can be effected via rotating the rear wheel.

3. Remove the spark plug and put in the TDC tool. You can also use a hollowed out plug with a metal rod in it; see to it that rod does not fall into the chamber(you can use an Allen key)

4. Open points cover and check the points gap with feeler gauge and set it at 0.35-0.4mm. Plastic visiting card is ~ 0.4 mm

5. connect the lighting set up. connect one clip to the points nut and other to chassis( I connected it to seat clamp). Do not let the clip connected to points nut to touch back-plate.

6.switch on ignition and see whether light is on( or whether points are open).. if so rotate the rear wheel in CLOCKWISE(viewed from spark-plug side of the bike) till lights go off( or points close) . rotate CLOCKWISE bit more.

7. rotate rear wheel slowly in the ANTICLOCKWISE direction looking at the TDC tool till the piston is at the top...rock back and forth till piston reaches top.note the reading of the gauge of TDC tool.. or in the case of using hollowed out plug and rod, the point where the rod protrudes maximum. make a mark with file and another mark about0.8mm above this mark.

8. again rotate rear wheel ANTI-CLOCKWISE and take it to a position where the reading is 0.8 mm above the TDC reading/mark(a bit less than one mm mark). If you had accidentally passed the mark, then do all the above process again. DO NOT ROTATE BACK. Rotate the wheel in one direction (ANTI-CLOCKWISE) otherwise Cam gear backlash will act and movement of piston and rear wheel will loose synchronization and will give false reading.(if it has passed the top mark, repeat from step-4 onwards)

9. at that position(0.8mm above TDC), loosen the lock nuts of points back-plate with 8no tubular spanner and adjust back-plate so that lights JUST turns on.

10. tighten back-plate and check again to check that ignition is correct.

VOILA.. done..This is my method for static timing adjustment. As I am doing only city riding currently, this is enough

ride safe

:) :) :)

GreenMachine

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2013, 04:00:29 PM »
Coolgoosse 2: Thanks for that clear explanation of setting up the 350/500cc bullet using points..The pics were a added plus...I'll print it out and staple it inside the back of my snidal manual...I was going to say, since you're at TDC, you might want to check your valves and adjust if necessary..Do you actually drink that "Old Monk Rum"?  I have once..GM
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AgentX

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2013, 05:46:42 PM »
Old Monk is most useful as a cleaning solvent or incendiary.   :)

Setting the timing static to .8mm is a good way to get it in the ballpark, but most experts seem to recommend setting it dynamically.  This will account for individual variations with your engine and setup.

And if you time dynamically you don't even have to get as precise as .8mm to start off.  Snidal's has the procedure and you can search it online.  You will however need to find a good place to do it, preferably a long, isolated hill with minimal traffic and a decent place to pull off the road.

316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2013, 08:13:01 PM »
Appreciate the timing input! Went out this morning and kicked it over a few times and even messed with the electronic ignition. It sounds and feels to me as though the engine is not building compression. Any suggestions on that? I put a cap full if gas in the spark plug chamber to see if it would kick over with that, negative results. Also, I can take the plug out and put my finger directly over the hole while cranking and I can feel compression but it's not enough to push my finger off.

High On Octane

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2013, 09:40:06 PM »
Sounds like you either have a valve stuck open or burnt piston rings.  Any signs of oil on your exhaust tip?

Scottie
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Arizoni

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2013, 10:03:00 PM »
316CMH
The compression should have been enough to blow your finger off of the spark plug hole while the engine was being kicked over.

The first thing to check is the decompression valve and its related cable.  It might have failed to close and seal off the cylinder.

Although oil is the preferred fluid, your adding a capfull of gas thru the spark plug hole should have raised the compression if the piston rings were the problem.  The fact that it didn't make a notable difference indicates either the valves are leaking or the head gasket is at fault.

Check the adjustment of the pushrods to make sure they can both be easily turned with your fingers when the piston is at top dead center on the compression stroke.
If your lucky, one of them will be tight and loosening it will fix the problem.

If they both are easily turned (or even slightly loose) your valves are probably at fault.

Jim
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baird4444

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2013, 01:39:39 AM »
let's not over look the simple...
the bike hasn't run for a long time. Before we decide on rings
I would pour a little oil down the spark plug hole and slowly kick over
 a few times. Now put the plug in and see if you can feel an
increase in compression in the kicker....
  a dry cylinder will spin freely- Mike
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316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2013, 06:28:27 PM »
I put a small amount of oil in the cylinder when I first got it home.  I took the head off yesterday and made sure the gasket was clean and getting a good seal. Prior to removing the head I checked the valves, both pushrods were tight, would not spin. Once I put everything back together,  I adjusted them properly. Tried to start it and it's backfiring into the carburetor. A blue fireball actually shot out! Where to from here? By the way, you guys are awesome! All your help is greatly appreciated.

High On Octane

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2013, 07:07:07 PM »
If you're shooting a flame out of the carb you are either seriously lean or you're out of time.  If it shot an actual fireball chances are your timing is too far advanced.

Scottie
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316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2013, 07:35:41 PM »
Thanks Scottie. I'm able to do some things mechanically myself, do you recommend adjusting the points plate or timing itself? Timing in the motor intimidates me a bit, just being honest. Looks at this point I'll be giving my son a "rolling" project for Christmas.  Hope he don't want me to push him down the driveway.

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2013, 08:33:26 PM »
I'm not familiar with your points set up but you should be able to adjust the timing in the points plate itself.  Don't give up!  You're almost there!

Scottie
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AgentX

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2013, 10:09:54 PM »
Appreciate the timing input! Went out this morning and kicked it over a few times and even messed with the electronic ignition.

Wait, so do you have points or a retro-fitted electronic ignition of some kind?

Blltrdr

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2013, 12:12:04 AM »
A couple posts above coolgoose2 gave a pretty good description of what you need to do to get it set up for your starting point. Using the lamp as suggested will get you in the ballpark as far as static timed, from there you will have to advance the timing plate slightly and then take it for a spin up an incline in a higher gear and listen for ping. You want to advance it till you get a little ping on your uphill runs in your higher gear then back off slightly so there is little or no ping when lugging slightly uphill. At this point you will have your timing optimized. I hope you have a manual. If not get yourself a copy of the Snidal manual.
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coolgoose2

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2013, 04:55:42 AM »
Old Monk is good.. ;) ;D
It solves lot of issues  :o :P

btw, in case of adjustment of timing in 'dynamic' way,  tune the carburetor first. You may need to change/clean air filter and carburetor (For details on cleaning carburetor refer this link
http://urge2blabber.blogspot.in/2008/05/cleaning-carburettor.html
In normal cases, checking float bowl will tell us whether it needs cleaning or not. If float bowl is clean, don't mess with it.

Tuning the carburetor:-

I do it like this:-
 
1. Ride the bike for couple of kms or so ( to get engine just warm);
2. increase the idle (turn the idle screw clockwise) so that idle speed is increased to somewhat like riding at 45-50 kmph in fourth gear;
3. close the air-screw fully( turn it clockwise). Do it slowly.. don't strip the thread;
4. loosen the air screw slowly(turn it anti-clockwise)... real slowly... so that idle speed peaks..(this happens somewhere between one and a half to two full turns)
5. At that position of air-screw.. loosen the idle screw back to normal beat( turn it anti-clockwise)..
6. If your carb has a screw between carb and inlet manifold, tighten it.. Don't over tighten and strip the thread

Once the carburetor is tuned, (it is exactly NOT tuned, as your timing is out), adjust timing like this.
Bring the piston to TDC and check whether your lamp lights (or points just part). You don't need TDC finder for this.
How to adjust ignition timing, dynamically:-
1. Tune the carb as detailed above
2. Open the CB point cover
3. slightly loosen the two holding nuts
4. Start the bike
5. increase the idle speed..
6. Take the point plate fully clockwise.. beat will be very very slow.
7. slowly tap the condenser screw top with a screwdriver
8. At one point idle speed will peak..
9. make one small.. very small tap on the condenser
10. screw everything tight
11. decrease idle speed to normal beat

If you timing was far off, you may need to tune carburetor again (for this adjusted timing) and again set the timing correctly.

You will be rewarded with gentle start, clean beat and better mileage.

ride safe
« Last Edit: December 04, 2013, 05:02:15 AM by coolgoose2 »

316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2013, 11:17:17 AM »
Thanks a ton guys.  The "electronic" ignition I was referring to was the push start, thought maybe it would be easier than kicking it. I've put a new decompressor plunger in it, one thing I have noticed is that there doesn't appear to be any deflection on the battery meter while kicking it. If I don't use the decompression switch should I be able to kick it over and over or will it eventually build up to much pressure for this? Going back out today to work on it some more, hopefully I can figure something out. Thanks for all of your input this far.

AgentX

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2013, 01:28:43 PM »
Using the kicker multiple times won't "build up" pressure; as the engine goes through its cycle of operation the exhaust valve opens and lets out the previously-compressed air.  You'll get a compression stroke every time you go through the full engine cycle of operations, of course, but it's the same every time.

People do run these bikes without decompressors; you should be able to get it through the compression stroke without using it...but it's going to be a lot more difficult than with.  General advice from Snidal's manual is that you should be able to stand on the kicker during compression.

Was the ammeter ever deflecting?  If it's not with a standard points setup, you have a problem somewhere.  The deflection should happen as the points open.

High On Octane

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2013, 01:52:08 PM »
My twin is bored +.040 and has no decomp or ES.  I can kick start it on the 1st kick almost every time.  It's all in the tuning.

Scottie
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GreenMachine

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2013, 03:38:18 PM »
Scottie:  + 1 on the tuning
Coolgoose: Is this the Zen of Enfield Maintenance that I always heard about or is it the Old Monk kicking in (small taps on the condensor ;D)...
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ace.cafe

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2013, 04:01:56 PM »
Take this bike to somebody who knows how to jet it, time it, tune it, and make it run right.
Then you have a baseline that should be correct, IF the mechanic actually has a clue about what he's doing.

After that, you can take all these suggestions and use them to keep the bike in a properly running condition.

Clearly, you are way over your head with this, and it's better to get it put right by somebody in the know, and then learn about keeping it going right.
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316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #24 on: December 04, 2013, 04:31:05 PM »
I agree with you ace. I think old boy that sold it to me seen me coming on this one.  Going to polish it up nice (I'm pretty experienced in that as I drive an '04 Vengeance chopper) and roll it down the sidewalk Christmas morning. Thanks again for all of the help and Happy Holidays.

Blltrdr

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2013, 04:33:14 PM »
I think Ace is partly right. If the intention is on giving the Bullet as a gift it would be marvelous to have it running in a tiptop manner. But I do recall this forums members helping many others over the years with little to no experience to work out their problems but that sometimes takes a very long time. The one thing I haven't figured out yet is if 316cmh has a manual to reference. If not, then c'mon man get a manual (preferably a Snidal). When I first got my Bullet there was no RE US forum to gather info and get questions answered. I had the factory manual and bought a Snidal manual right away. I researched the manuals front to back then back to front as I tinkered on my bike. Slowly but methodically I taught myself everything I needed to know to care for my bike. 316cmh may have little vested interest in the bike since this bike is intended as a gift and not keeper. All I can say is if you plan on giving this bike as a gift to your son make sure a manual is included. Hopefully everything can be sorted before Christmas. It is better to give (a running Bullet) than to receive (one that does not run). ;D
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316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2013, 04:58:43 PM »
Agreed, I wanted it to at least start. My son is 10 so we have a few years to work on it. I'll get the manuals and we can bob it out together. Again, thanks for yalls help.

Blltrdr

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2013, 05:41:15 PM »
Holy geez dad a Bullet! When I was your sons age I was rippin up the roads and trails with my '64 Honda CB 90. It was a great project for my dad and I to work on and really was my springboard for learning about and fixing anything and everything. Watching On any Sunday in the summer of 1971 and Evel Knievel on The Wide World of Sports started me down the path of two wheeled obsession. Hope your son catches the bug the way I did.
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baird4444

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2013, 05:42:10 PM »
I'm going to give you a totally different explanation of the timing
process that may be easier to understand. It is from the FAQ's on the
old DRS Cycle website from years gone by. Dan Holmes was rather long
winded at times but he DID give an easier explanation for the beginner
to understand....    - Mike 
  good luck, these bikes are as much for learning as they are for riding!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
How often should I check the timing on my Enfield ! What is the correct procedure ?
This is somewhat subjective . I would say checking the timing should be done on the average around a 1000 miles , now don't panic! Once the timing has been set correctly with a dial indicator mounted in the sparkplug hole, the next thing to do is make a permanent reference mark indexing the point plate and the distributor! Now do not realign the plate unneccesarily ever, all you have to do is clean your points. I use a point file or carbide sandpaper. Spray the points with contact cleaner, wipe clean & blow dry. Then gap the points to 16 thousandths! Timing is now set. Last but not least add a little dab of grease to the inside heel of the contact arm to lubricate the heel and minimize the wear. Increasing the gap advances the timing and closing it retards it. The ignition timing on a bullet is very easily set and even easier maintained. First , clean , gap and set points. Note the point cam is not always true in concentricity and the fact that it is centrifugal advance. It is very important to determine that the advance mechanism is not stuck and that you pick your spot to set the points (you need to recognize the spot for future reference to maintain point gap). I suggest that you pick a point off the ramp but just on the step and set the points at 15-16 thousandths (mark the spot). Once the point gap is set you now need to find top dead center on the compression stroke , this the same position that you would start the engine at. Here is where it gets a little more particular , since the gear train drives the distributor you need to back up from TDC to .8mm, always back in, if you miss go forward and back in again. If you are useing a TDC tool available from DRS Cycle for $10.00, you find TDC and then back up one little mark or about 1/32. Once you have arrived at this location the next step is to rotate the point plate so the points are just opening here, the better job you do of this the better the results. We use a buzz box, some people use a light, and others just eyeball it. Note, once you get the point plate set, all you have to do for a long, long time is maintain point gap, eccentric screws, slots, all that is unneccesary, the slot might make it handier, but if you loosen the retaining screws you can turn it by hand. The timing is very important for predictable idle and starting, as well as overall performance. However it is not really micrometer precise. It is more like a yardstick measurement. The only real precise way to time is dynamicly using a timing light. Static timing is low tech, and less time consuming. Easily done and very effective. ONCE the point plate is set and you find the timing is satisfactory, make a permanent mark, (Punch, nail, scratch ). This is the plate alignment mark, should you feel you need to take the plate out for some reason.
Every time anyone disturbs the plate they alter the timing unneccesarily. At some point in time, say when one replaces points or at extended intervals, the whole procedure should be repeated to compensate for wear. One should periodically look at the condenser to be sure it is not hitting on the advance, we have found this will cut the can on the condenser, then burn the points and heat up the coil to a point of failure.

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316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2013, 07:53:29 PM »
Thanks Baird! That sounds much simpler, gonna give it a go in the morning.
My son currently rides a Yamaha tt90, he's been riding sinc he was 5, with me always having at least one bike he's also gotten obsessed with them as well. He's really into bobbers which is why I bought this, figured it would be a good starter bike and project to chop. Kicking it over in front of him Christmas morning will be the icing on the cake for him.

amritc

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2013, 08:42:45 PM »
This is a great post and full of informative learning for us neophytes..

How would I set the timing if my plate is already at full retard and has no more way to give (clockwise)? I understand in these cases the plate must be taken off and the distributor shaft be rotated by hand to give the plate a central point in order to allow for retard and advance movement  once again. My questions are;

1) How do you move the distributor shaft?
2) In what direction will you need to move the shaft in order to allow the plate to be put back on with enough space to move back and forth (Clock Wise and Anti Clock Wise)?
3) Once timing is set and the plate is tightened up where shoudl the reference point be marked? On the plate? Or behind the plate?

Thanks once again.

baird4444

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2013, 09:10:56 PM »
all below are from my files. hope they can help.
we were ALL Newbies once - Mike

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
How old are your points? and what is the gap? The points may need
replacing.
Dont forget to place a drop of light oil on the felt wick that lubes
the points cam. (1 drop each month or 1000 miles...)

The Auto advance it a taper fit into its drave shaft; to remove it,
either use the correct 'puller' or simply remove the central retaining
bolt, insert a short metal bar in through the center of the AA, and
give it a short sharp rap with a hammer; that will break free the taper
of the AA unit from the shaft.

The correct 'puller' is easy to make from a bolt that will screw into
the thread in the outer end of the AA unit, and a suitale lenght of
1/4" rod that is inserted into the drive shaft and allows 'puller' bolt
to bottom out onto it; thereby extracting the AA unit.

A Handy tip: Mark the AA unit first (with a dot of paint?) and a
reference mark in the housing, so that you know where it was located.
Start by repositioning the AA unit so that it is 2-3mm (1/8") back
(counter clockwise) from where it was previously situated. That should
provide you with adequate 'retard', and see your points plate
centralised again.

Tim
N.Z

There's a much easier way to do this. The advance unit is screwed onto the end of the shaft and stays in place by a tapered fit. Simply loosen the retaining screw, and give the end of the unit a nice solid whack with a mallet, or drift.(I use a piece of wood and a hammer.)
 it drops right off. From there adjust as necessary, and reassemble. With the bike in gear, and the rear brake applied,
you should be able to get it good and tight.
Much easier and quicker than going through the timing chest.
Cheers,
Pat
"You can't drink all day if you don't start in the morning!! "
        -Cody Baird
'My dear you are ugly,
 but tomorrow I shall be sober and you will still be ugly'
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AgentX

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2013, 10:19:35 PM »
This is a great post and full of informative learning for us neophytes..

How would I set the timing if my plate is already at full retard and has no more way to give (clockwise)? I understand in these cases the plate must be taken off and the distributor shaft be rotated by hand to give the plate a central point in order to allow for retard and advance movement  once again. My questions are;

1) How do you move the distributor shaft?

2) In what direction will you need to move the shaft in order to allow the plate to be put back on with enough space to move back and forth (Clock Wise and Anti Clock Wise)?
3) Once timing is set and the plate is tightened up where shoudl the reference point be marked? On the plate? Or behind the plate?

Thanks once again.

During the re-setting process, you set the piston position by rotating the rear wheel while the bike is in top gear.  You will measure piston height through the spark plug hole; I think the purpose-made tool for this pays for itself the first time you use it.

Rotating the wheel in gear moves all the engine internals, including the distributor shaft, as the piston rises and falls.  When the piston is in the right place, you'll break the taper-fit between the CB and the distributor shaft  (using a puller or a mallet per baird's post) and reset in the acceptable range, then tighten the taper again.  Should be able to get it adjusted this way so everything is good with the points fixing screws dead-middle in the slots.

That's just a broad overview of the process.

You guys should all get the Snidal manual.  I don't think it's a perfect publication, but it's about as good as we get.

coolgoose2

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #33 on: December 05, 2013, 04:12:46 AM »
Scottie:  + 1 on the tuning
Coolgoose: Is this the Zen of Enfield Maintenance that I always heard about or is it the Old Monk kicking in (small taps on the condensor ;D)...

Ha ha. Actually,a bit of both. Monk is good. They have a seven year old version, which is even better  ;)
I started reading Pirsig in early 90s and finished in 2009.  It's probably the best book on motorcycle maintenance, irrespective of what the author claims.

Regarding 'Zen' of Nandan, here is the link for those who needs it, pretty sums up everything.
http://www.nandanmotors.com/adj_ignition.html

cheers  ;D

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #34 on: December 25, 2013, 10:10:22 AM »
IT'S ALIVE!!! My father in law had in running within 2 hours yesterday!  The man is a mechanical genius. He's never seen a Royal Enfield, moved the points plate until it fired and started (was nowhere near any of the holes to mount it back so he held it in place with a c clamp) he took off the cover and moved some gears around, moved the points plate where it should be and bam! This guy doesn't know how to turn on a computer but if it has a motor, he'll fix it. Going to have one happy little fella as soon as he wakes up! Merry Christmas everyone

ace.cafe

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #35 on: December 25, 2013, 01:34:18 PM »
Merry Christmas!
:)
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High On Octane

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #36 on: December 25, 2013, 01:59:26 PM »
Freaking Sweet!  Merry Christmas!
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Blltrdr

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #37 on: December 25, 2013, 07:01:05 PM »
Awesome! Merry Christmas.
2003 Classic 500 5 spd
1992 Kawasaki ZG 1200 Voyager XII
1977 Yamaha XS 360-2D (Cafe Project)

AgentX

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #38 on: December 25, 2013, 08:56:15 PM »
he took off the cover and moved some gears around, moved the points plate where it should be and bam!

Congrats!!  That's awesome.  Merry christmas indeed!

Sounds like he popped off the timing cover and re-oriented the distributor drive gear.

There's also a way to do to adjust the timing beyond the slots without pulling off the timing cover.  You can break the taper between the advance unit/cam assembly by whacking it with a screwdriver handle or dead blow hammer, then adjust the position of the cam to where you want it and re-set the taper.

Not that you should need to do that again now, ever...  :)

316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #39 on: January 03, 2014, 01:49:32 PM »
Here's a picture of the happy little fella.

Blltrdr

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #40 on: January 03, 2014, 09:28:00 PM »
Here's a picture of the happy little fella.

I think you will have to download pic again. Can't seem to open it.
2003 Classic 500 5 spd
1992 Kawasaki ZG 1200 Voyager XII
1977 Yamaha XS 360-2D (Cafe Project)

316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #41 on: January 05, 2014, 01:02:44 PM »
Hope this opens...

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #42 on: January 05, 2014, 02:27:57 PM »
How awesome!  Bet that little man was super excited to have his first big boy bike.  Have you started him on a dirt bike yet?   :)

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316CMH

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #43 on: January 05, 2014, 02:44:04 PM »
Oh yeah,  he started on a yamaha 50 when he was about 5 I guess. Then I moved him up to a tt90.

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Re: How to adjust timing?
« Reply #44 on: January 05, 2014, 04:11:46 PM »
That's awesome!  I'd like to get a couple old XR80s to get my kids riding.  I think I'm going to be checking out criagslist this summer and see if I can't find something for them.  :)  I'm really glad you were able to get that bike fired up JUST in time for Christmas.  That's good stuff right there.  :)

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