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Author Topic: Polishing engine cases  (Read 830 times)

nisonov

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Polishing engine cases
« on: December 15, 2013, 04:30:30 PM »
Hi,

I have started with 600 grit sand paper, planning to move ahead in steps 800 - 1200 to 2000.

I just made a little trial with the timing cover and noticed it is pretty hard task as there are bolt holes and variations in the surface.

I have seen here good examples of pretty impressive work. Can some of you with experience give me some hints about the tools used and best practises?

Many thanks!

BR

Andy

flyboy

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2013, 07:42:16 PM »
What year is your ride? Why would you want to remove that lovely patina that's taken years to acquire? Save all the hard work and enjoy the natural look! Just my feelings tho.

ERC

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2013, 11:33:06 PM »
What your doing is correct. When you get to the last paper polish with a good metal polish then wax over it, it'll last then. If you want to spend some money get yourself a buffing wheel.  ERC
2-57 Apaches, 2-57 Trailblazers, 60 Chief, 65 Interceptor, 2004 Bullet, 612 Bullet chopped.

single

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2013, 12:09:42 AM »
You can get into the tite spots with 0000 steel wool.I use this with any good aluminum polish.I mean,with the polish in the wool.On some aluminum,I am able to see a good result using only these,but usually it needs the sandpaper 1st.You mite try to follow the paper with 3000,a sponge like contrivance that I am starting to view as I do duct tape and scotchbrite.
Polishing is all about smoothing the surface,so there may be a few ways to do it, but these work well.

High On Octane

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2013, 04:18:37 AM »
I did some extensive polishing not too long ago.  You might learn a few tips from this thread.

http://www.enfieldmotorcycles.com/forum/index.php/topic,15931.0.html

Scottie
Bulldog Kustoms - Denver, CO
Specializing In Kustom Paint

The Blackhawk
1958 Enfield/Indian 711cc Twin

Building the 1st EVER Supercharged RE Twin
FULL RACE motor with ACE Performance

02Electra

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2013, 06:19:46 AM »
I would only touch sandpaper (howsoever soft) on the cases if I was dealing with severe oxidation resulting from decades of neglect. Or if I want to scrub away some clear coat etc. It's easier to put scratches on the cases than take them out.

In all other cases, just metal polish and loads of elbow grease and rags is all you need. I use Mothers Mag and Al Polish and would highly recommend it.

For total OCD polishing - use Mothers Billet metal polish after you're finished with Mag & Al polish. It is a finer compound designed for the last step.

Here's what I did this weekend :

Cheers.
2002 RE Electra CDI
India

nisonov

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2013, 06:45:24 PM »
Very nice advice!

Thanks everyone!

I'm intending to upgrade my bullet with some of ACE performance parts. Also including Hitchcocks super expensive crank. Now that i'm working on these, i thought of polishing all the aluminum as well.

02electra, very impressive work!

Once again, very usefull info from you guys!

Thanks!

BR

Andy

High On Octane

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2013, 01:34:12 PM »
 I HIGHLY recommend getting one of these (or any variation of) :

http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_headlight-lens-restoration-system-3m_7100089-p?navigationPath=L1

  Keep wet sanding in incremental steps of grit until you get to 1500-2500 grit paper, and then use metal polishing/rubbing compound and one of those buffing wheels.  Not only will it make buffing out your sand scratches 1000X easier, you will get 100x more shine out of it in the end.

Scottie
Bulldog Kustoms - Denver, CO
Specializing In Kustom Paint

The Blackhawk
1958 Enfield/Indian 711cc Twin

Building the 1st EVER Supercharged RE Twin
FULL RACE motor with ACE Performance

Ballroom dancer

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2013, 01:40:04 AM »
I'm currently polishing a 2006 Bullet that I believe was brought over to Washington state from Hawaii on the deck of a fishing trawler.  I'm having to start with 220 grit.  So far I'm only going to 600 grit and then to Rouge on a sewn polishing mop.  It's a big job.  The sanding is done wet with just a touch of dishwashing detergent in the water and a sponge to back the paper.

High On Octane

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2013, 02:02:30 AM »
I'm currently polishing a 2006 Bullet that I believe was brought over to Washington state from Hawaii on the deck of a fishing trawler.  I'm having to start with 220 grit.  So far I'm only going to 600 grit and then to Rouge on a sewn polishing mop.  It's a big job.  The sanding is done wet with just a touch of dishwashing detergent in the water and a sponge to back the paper.

You are going to be buffing for a long long time if you only sand to 600 grit.  Even then you are going to have a lot of sand scratches showing through your shine.  You need to sand to at least 1000 grit before you will start to see a deep shine when finished.  If you are going for a true mirror finish you will need to sand to between 2000-3000 grit before buffing.  Starting out with 220 grit for a polished surface is pretty gung ho.  As I'm sure you already starting to notice, it takes some serious work to get 220 scratches out of metal.  You are wet sanding, right?   ???

Scottie
Bulldog Kustoms - Denver, CO
Specializing In Kustom Paint

The Blackhawk
1958 Enfield/Indian 711cc Twin

Building the 1st EVER Supercharged RE Twin
FULL RACE motor with ACE Performance

Ballroom dancer

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2013, 06:48:03 PM »
We must all start where we're at and have a realistic goal on where we're going.  In my case I'm facing heavy corrosion probably from salt water.  So it's realistic to start with 220 grit wet sanding.  As for how fine a finish to strive for, the bike has rusty rims and the paint on the hub center section is peeling so a show finish just isn't appropriate.  If it looks like someone cares about the bike from ten feet that's good enough. 

flyboy

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Re: Polishing engine cases
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2013, 11:28:41 PM »
@ 02Electra - Beautiful results. I couldn't help but noticing the bed in the background. Did you do this in your bedroom, or did you move the bed into the shop?!?!
Nice job, looks like lots of hard work. Thanks for sharing.