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Author Topic: '06 Military  (Read 10852 times)

little_a_o

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'06 Military
« on: August 04, 2007, 01:41:26 AM »
:D
[old attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: December 25, 2007, 04:33:40 AM by little_a_o »

RagMan

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Re: Photos, including salient remarks of my '06 Military (stock)
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2007, 02:27:00 AM »
I am assured that transmissions often get worse in the first few hundred miles, and will be adjusted by the shop doing the 500 mile service.  I would be checking levels, making sure the supposed lube was there.  I am totally unfamiliar with the 5 speed, so cannot help you with it.
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

Thumper

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Re: Photos, including salient remarks of my '06 Military (stock)
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2007, 12:51:01 PM »
One easy thing you can check is for hidden slack in the cable. Check up on the handlebar at the clutch lever by firmly grasping the clutch cable (outer sheath) and pull/push it very firmly to see if there is slack (e.g., does it move significantly in and out of the lever). If so, adjust at the lever.

If there is hidden slack it's equivalent to screwing in the lever adjustment too far and the clutch not fully disengaging. Mine, for example, would not come out of neutral into second.

Matt

deejay

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Re: Photos, including salient remarks of my '06 Military (stock)
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2007, 12:55:21 PM »
I am assured that transmissions often get worse in the first few hundred miles, and will be adjusted by the shop doing the 500 mile service.  I would be checking levels, making sure the supposed lube was there.  I am totally unfamiliar with the 5 speed, so cannot help you with it.

Really? Mine got a lot better with miles. Although I get a false neutral between 3rd and 4th sometimes, i chalk it up to user error though. You have to shift like you mean it, even with the 5-speed.

little_a_o

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Military
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2007, 01:32:05 PM »
;D
« Last Edit: December 25, 2007, 04:20:10 AM by little_a_o »

RagMan

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Re: Photos, including salient remarks of my '06 Military (stock)
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2007, 02:14:22 PM »
Though mine is an older 4 speed, I had a similar experience when I bought it - the gears would not find 3rd, changing down, and would slam into 2nd - not good if traveling fast and needing to slow down.  I took it back to the dealer I got it from and they fixed it - they told me it had been badly adjusted...  Whatever they did changed the nature of the machine completely - it is a positive gear changer now, with no missed gears. 
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
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Robb

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Re: Photos, including salient remarks of my '06 Military (stock)
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2007, 06:07:49 PM »
Another little trick to smooth out shifting is to blip the throttle while clutching to match engine and transmission speeds while going down the gears.  In a race car, it's called heel/toe shifting and the idea (in a car) is to brake with the big toe of your right foot, then angle your heel over to the gas pedal to rev the car at the same time as you push in the clutch, shift down, and then re-engage the clutch.  It's way easier on a bike.  Brake with two fingers, pull in the clutch lever, blip the throttle up about 500 revs or so at the same time as you're shifting down, then release clutch.  Repeat down through the gears.  It's a whole lot easier to do than it is to describe!  The whole process takes about 1 second.  Forgive me if you already know this, but for those who don't it can be a big help.  This technique also allows you to maximize the use of engine braking.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2007, 07:57:58 PM by Robb »

little_a_o

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Military
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2007, 07:25:52 PM »
:-X
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« Last Edit: December 25, 2007, 04:21:36 AM by little_a_o »

scoTTy

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Re: Photos, including salient remarks of my '06 Military (stock)
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2007, 03:41:44 AM »
300 + miles on an Electra 5 speed..  notchy  n shifting.. bike wasn't set up at dealer.. will rereport  when the temps N the garage get below 100 degrees and every thing is done right

little_a_o

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'06 Military
« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2007, 09:53:44 PM »
 ;D





[old attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: December 25, 2007, 04:22:09 AM by little_a_o »

little_a_o

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'06 Military
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2007, 09:39:24 PM »
 ;D

[old attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: December 25, 2007, 04:22:33 AM by little_a_o »

little_a_o

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'06 Military
« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2007, 07:55:16 PM »
 ;D
« Last Edit: December 25, 2007, 04:22:55 AM by little_a_o »

Leonard

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Re: '06 Military (Discoveries)
« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2007, 08:20:55 PM »
On occasion when I come to a stop the engine is still rev'd up.   This has been happening since the 125 mile mark as best I can tell.   All the throttle twisting, carb tapping  I do has no effect.  I did however notice that on all occasions if I cycle the choke on and off it will reset itself back down to normal idle. 

Experiences?


  I find that the choke (Micarb) will stick just a little sometimes.  I've got into the habit of pushing down on the top instead of using just the lever.
  You might also want to lube the advance, sometimes it will stick and then it will take awhile to idle down.
Leonard
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c1skout

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Re: '06 Military (Discoveries)
« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2007, 02:13:54 AM »
  Mine was doing that at around 1200 miles but it went away by itself before I got around to trying to find the problem. Mine would start to rev up after it was warm while sitting at traffic lights.

Digger77091

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Re: '06 Military (Discoveries)
« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2007, 03:13:38 AM »
I heard all of the horror stories when I got my new Military and put a side car on it the first time without breaking it in. I assembled the side car and attached it myself with no difficulty and got the alignments right the first time. I haven't had to change or adjust anything with the sidecar since I bought it. I did, however, install a seventeen tooth countershaft sprocket and heavy duty clutch springs to make my bike more compatible with the mountain roads where I live. In the beginning I had some problems with missed shifts and false neutrals but I was told by a friend that I should drive it like I meant it and so I ran the "P" out of it up and down the mountain roads, around corners going up and down in the gears and my bike came along beautifully. I treated it like I was racing, reving the engine slightly just before each shift to match RPMs between the rear wheel and the engine and the shifting problems disappeared. Also I found that it helps to have a positive load on the wheels when shifting. In other words you have to be moving under power. It is damnably difficult to shift while standing still between any gear except first and neutral.. If you approach a stop in second gear, make sure you shift into neutral before you stop. Other wise you might not be able to shift into first to start up again. Occasionally you might have to down shift to first and then back up into neutral