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Author Topic: Emgo mufflers  (Read 733 times)

gremlin

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Re: Emgo mufflers
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2014, 11:06:20 PM »
The wobble may be due to low pressure in your rear tire. Verify 24 psi and see if it helps.

I run 33+
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 11:16:35 PM by gremlin »
1996 Trophy 1200
2011 RE B5
1979 XS11 w/vetter terraplane
1981 XS11 streetfighter
1983 Venture Royale
1982 CB750K
1971 Triumph Trident
1969 CB450
1966 Sears (puch) 250


Roeland

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Re: Emgo mufflers
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2014, 05:23:44 AM »
The 36 psi on the sidewall has absolutely nothing to do with the proper tire pressure for riding the back. That's the max pressure for the tire.
I always ran about 20 psi in my G5 tires. I found that running over 24psi just made the ride extremely harsh.
Getting the original sludge that comes in the forks is very important to improving the ride. I used 10wt fork oil in my forks and it had a pretty nice ride with the low air pressures. Those who haven't changed the fork oil to some real stuff, don't know what your missing, like a comfortable ride. It's something that should be as soon as you get home from buying the bike. And please use fork oil that is meant for the job. Some people use ATF, an old wives tale that started in the '50s before tere wasa any such thingas fork oil. The factories recommend motor oil which was a bit to stiff for forks. However, specific fork oil was developed and meant to be put in forks and works very well.  But the ATF business still lives on...I don't know why.
I put Hagon shocks on the rear. Dave Quinn will put the proper spring on it when you order it and give them your weight, etc. The stock shocks are just not good.
Bare
Hi Bare, I usually ride with a pillion and my rear shocks tend to bottom out causing the rear tire to hit the fender. The profile of the tyre is a little bit higher than standard (knobbly tyre). Would this be eliminated using the Hagon shocks or should I investigate slightly longer shocks? Thanks

suitcasejefferson

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Re: Emgo mufflers
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2014, 05:55:31 AM »
The 36 psi on the sidewall has absolutely nothing to do with the proper tire pressure for riding the back. That's the max pressure for the tire.
I always ran about 20 psi in my G5 tires. I found that running over 24psi just made the ride extremely harsh.
Getting the original sludge that comes in the forks is very important to improving the ride. I used 10wt fork oil in my forks and it had a pretty nice ride with the low air pressures. Those who haven't changed the fork oil to some real stuff, don't know what your missing, like a comfortable ride. It's something that should be as soon as you get home from buying the bike. And please use fork oil that is meant for the job. Some people use ATF, an old wives tale that started in the '50s before tere wasa any such thingas fork oil. The factories recommend motor oil which was a bit to stiff for forks. However, specific fork oil was developed and meant to be put in forks and works very well.  But the ATF business still lives on...I don't know why.
I put Hagon shocks on the rear. Dave Quinn will put the proper spring on it when you order it and give them your weight, etc. The stock shocks are just not good.
Bare

I will be fiddling with things later, but for now, max preload on the shocks and 35 psi in the tires is working great for me, with my weight. All of my bikes have at least 32 psi in the tires. So do my cars. It may be the "max" pressure, but it is well within the safe range. Tire manufacturers leave a wide safety margin. The Firestone tire/Ford Explorer fiasco turned out to be caused by Ford recommending less tire pressure than the tires were designed for, because their customers were complaining about a harsh ride. Guess they probably shouldn't have bought a truck. If owners has used the tire pressure shown on the sidewall, none of it would have ever happened.

During the first 10 years or so of my job, I did a lot of scheduled service work on fleet vehicles. I found that most of these vehicles, which were serviced only every 6 months, had nearly flat tires when they came in. The ones I worked on always left with the tires inflated to the pressure  shown on the sidewall. Nobody ever complained about the ride.

I also have a Yamaha XT225, which is a small dual sport bike. It has a bad reputation for wheel problems. Broken spokes, spokes pulled right through the rim, holes torn out of the soft aluminum hub, etc. Yet I have put over 30,000 miles on mine, and never had a single wheel problem, even with my weight. I run 32 psi in the tires. I discovered on the forums that most riders were running half that. Now it made sense. The nearly flat tires were allowing the wheels to flex too much, and eventually they started coming apart. They are cheap wheels, but if you keep the tires fully inflated, the tire/wheel combination holds up very well.

On cars, I have seen a lot of tires worn out due to underinflation (worn tread on both sides, not worn in the middle) but almost none worn out from overinflation (exactly the opposite). I have never had any problems with unusual or excessive tire wear when running them at sidewall pressure. They wear very evenly, and tend to last a long time.

This is the way I do it, and it works for me. I am not trying to convince anyone to change what works for them. But as far as vehicle comfort goes, it has never been one of my priorities. At least as far a a slightly rough ride, or even a somewhat uncomfortable seat. The one thing I cannot handle is an uncomfortable riding position, such as that found on sport bikes. I have fairly severe arthritis, fibromyalgia, bad knees and bad shoulders. I just can't bend my legs up into pretzels and support most of my upper body weight with my arms.
I am a motorcyclist, NOT a biker.
2013 Royal Enfield B5
2002 Kawasaki Vulcan 750
2001 Yamaha XT225
2015 SYM HD200 scooter
2009 Genuine Stella 2 stroke scooter
1971 VeloSolex S3800

lemming

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Re: Emgo mufflers
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2014, 12:59:52 PM »
Maxed out the preload and Tonks felt much better sorted today. Granted, it was damp out, so I didn't flog her. Will report back on how she flicks through the twisties when the roads are dry. Certainly stiffer over bumps, but that doesn't bother me.
"I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant"

2011 B5 Black - "Tonks"
Middlebury, VT

lemming

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Re: Emgo mufflers
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2014, 11:50:36 PM »
Took VT 17 through Appalachian Gap on my way home today from Montpelier, a twisty and fun (albeit frostheaved all to hell) mountain two lane, and the preload adjustment made a huge difference. Still wallowed a touch when I hit a big bump mid-corner, but stayed planted. I did, however, scrape the tailpipe in a corner, so will be thinking hard about a shorter, upswept pipe.
"I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant"

2011 B5 Black - "Tonks"
Middlebury, VT