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Author Topic: changing exhaust pipes  (Read 2677 times)

mythos

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changing exhaust pipes
« on: September 22, 2008, 05:43:10 PM »
i have a scrambler pipe installed on my 02 bullet and wanna put the stock exhaust on it instead. how would i go about doing this???

stipa

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Re: changing exhaust pipes
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2008, 08:25:51 PM »
Uhhh,  if you do that you're probably gonna have to knock your jetting back on your carby. If not, you may run way too rich.
 Do you have the stock air cleaner?  If not, you might have to go back to that too. 
Classic has the Classic (exhaust system);  you could then get away from that high pipe and still have some power, (and sound). 
The engine will thank you for it!!!

mythos

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Re: changing exhaust pipes
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2008, 08:48:04 PM »
this is my first bike so i am still learning terminology... what does jetting mean?

also does the scrambler pipe put extra stress on the engine? i like it because people can hear me coming from far away but it prevents me from putting any passengers on the bike.

Leonard

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2009 Triumph Bonneville T100
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RAKe

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Re: changing exhaust pipes
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2008, 03:20:14 AM »
Mythos, let me help you with the basics of carburetion.  An internal combustion engine that runs on gasoline requires an accurate mixture of gas to air intake to feed into however many cylinders (combustion chambers) of the engine.  JETS are the carburetor feature that determines the amount of gas mixed with a set amount of air (whatever a given carb's venturi will allow).  Smaller jets therefore provide a leaner mixture (less fuel per volume of air) and larger jet provide a richer mixture.  Overly lean mixtures will result in an engine that "pops" under acceleration or deceleration while also overheating the combustion chamber(s), meaning the spark plugs will exhibit certain characteristics related to overheating (look to find an appropriate chart on the Web).  An overly rich mixture will result in an engine that is sluggish and/or nonresponsive, while also coating the plugs with a dry, black coating.  Please understand that this explanation is extremely basic, and does not explain any additional spark plug indications (such as oil blowby).  Good luck.

« Last Edit: October 14, 2008, 03:28:58 AM by RAKe »
196? Triumph 500 (basket case), 1968 BSA 650 (needed work), 1976 Triumph T140V 750 (ran well), 2004 Harley-Davidson XL883C, 2007 Harley-Davidson FXDB

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dewjantim

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Re: changing exhaust pipes
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2008, 06:05:35 PM »
If you really like the scrambler pipe but want to carry a passenger, why not make a shield or have one made to attach on the pipe to protect said passenger's leg. It would only take a small piece of aluminium, a vice, a small tree limb, leather mallet, two hose clamps and a little ingenuity. Even if you had it done the price should be under $75......Dewey.
If it hurts, you're not dead yet!!!!!