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Author Topic: End of a myth  (Read 7609 times)

deejay

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2007, 11:48:58 PM »
As far as younger new buyers.........they will go with faster bikes other than the Enfield.    Just my oppinion.     Hutch

hey not all of us! although, my friends who ride have ducatis and ninjas. i am the black sheep.

Like I said before, I'm glad I got my classic when I did. the new bikes will do well i'm sure, just look at the new bonnevilles... those are all over the place, and they sure ain't "real" bonnevilles. but triumph did what they could to please the purists, and updated the product.

I'm sure you're aware that we Bullet owners are a rare breed. the level of maintenance is simply not desired from most motorcyclists. It's not that i like the new direction, but i understand why it's being done. it may be a sad day for us, but an exciting one for RE.

hutch

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2007, 12:08:27 AM »
I sure do hope they keep the old look. I have had my Classic Bullet and my Savage 650 in the front yard for sale for 2 weeks now. No one even looks at the Savage, even when I tell them it is faster than the Bullet. I made up my mind that the Bullet was not for sale last week and nobody has stopped since. Now what does that tell you about the general publics thoughts??? In 1968 and 1/2 RE tried to upgrade their 750 Interceptor with the "grabbing at straws" last minute changes to save their line of twins, and they were nothing but unreliable oil leaking piece of junk. All you have to do is look up the cycle world test rides for the "new Interceptors" for 1969 and 70 to see that I am not lying.Which is why they stopped making them, and why I waited 39 years to find the last true time tested Interceptor, a 1967. The government has messed everything up with their do as I say and not what I do attitude. I don't know if anyone has seen the "Escape from New York and Escape from LA "movies, but to make along story short the Government wouldn't alow this and that, while they did what ever they wanted. They kept pulling a so called radical enemy of the state out of prison to do their dirty work. He got even in the end both times. I loved the last one. He got ahold of the control that the Government could use to shut down all electronics in any country so they could rule the world. There also happened to be a world wide shut down code. Seeing how messed up the world was, he decided to enter the 666 world wide shut down code, and put everybody back in the stone ages as far as technology was concerned. He figured like me, maybe we can get it right the NEXT time. The Lord tried that with the great flood, and that didn't work either............One can always hope though.     Hutch
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deejay

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2007, 12:12:39 AM »
I sure do hope they keep the old look. I have had my Classic Bullet and my Savage 650 in the front yard for sale for 2 weeks now. No one even looks at the Savage, even when I tell them it is faster than the Bullet. I made up my mind that the Bullet was not for sale last week and nobody has stopped since. Now what does that tell you about the general publics thoughts??? In 1968 and 1/2 RE tried to upgrade their 750 Interceptor with the "grabbing at straws" last minute changes to save their line of twins, and they were nothing but unreliable oil leaking piece of junk. All you have to do is look up the cycle world test rides for the "new Interceptors" for 1969 and 70 to see that I am not lying.Which is why they stopped making them, and why I waited 39 years to find the last true time tested Interceptor, a 1967. The government has messed everything up with their do as I say and not what I do attitude. I don't know if anyone has seen the "Escape from New York and Escape from LA "movies, but to make along story short the Government wouldn't alow this and that, while they did what ever they wanted. They kept pulling a so called radical enemy of the state out of prison to do their dirty work. He got even in the end both times. I loved the last one. He got ahold of the control that the Government could use to shut down all electronics in any country so they could rule the world. There also happened to be a world wide shut down code. Seeing how messed up the world was, he decided to enter the 666 world wide shut down code, and put everybody back in the stone ages as far as technology was concerned. He figured like me, maybe we can get it right the NEXT time. The Lord tried that with the great flood, and that didn't work either............One can always hope though.     Hutch

you were going to SELL the bullet??!?!? Oh, and those "Escape" movies are great!

hutch

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #18 on: October 07, 2007, 12:30:51 AM »
As far as younger new buyers.........they will go with faster bikes other than the Enfield.    Just my oppinion.     Hutch

hey not all of us! although, my friends who ride have ducatis and ninjas. i am the black sheep.

Like I said before, I'm glad I got my classic when I did. the new bikes will do well i'm sure, just look at the new bonnevilles... those are all over the place, and they sure ain't "real" bonnevilles. but triumph did what they could to please the purists, and updated the product.

I'm sure you're aware that we Bullet owners are a rare breed. the level of maintenance is simply not desired from most motorcyclists. It's not that i like the new direction, but i understand why it's being done. it may be a sad day for us, but an exciting one for RE.

Deejay, thanks for letting me know that not all the younger generation has lost their sense. One thing you should know is that the new Triumph has no dealings whatso ever with the old company. They can't even get you parts for the old ones. They also had to use a 800cc motor to keep up with the Japanese 650cc bike that came out 2 years earlier, and looks more like a Triumph than the new Triumphs do. Also,there is always excitement during chaos..........usually followed by despair.      I hope I am wrong.   Hutch
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deejay

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #19 on: October 07, 2007, 01:30:20 AM »

Deejay, thanks for letting me know that not all the younger generation has lost their sense. One thing you should know is that the new Triumph has no dealings whatso ever with the old company. They can't even get you parts for the old ones. They also had to use a 800cc motor to keep up with the Japanese 650cc bike that came out 2 years earlier, and looks more like a Triumph than the new Triumphs do. Also,there is always excitement during chaos..........usually followed by despair.      I hope I am wrong.   Hutch

I know about the new triumph bonnevilles all too well, that was my 1st motorcycle, before the Bullet. I sold it after 1 year of trying to tinker with it. The new bonnevilles seem to be doing well regardless, even though I didn't like it... I guess i'm just not normal. Oh, and I also agree about the Kawasaki W650 (if thats the jap bike you were referring to)... I remember parking my new Bonneville next to one and thinking the W650 looked much more correct.

It is a shame though about the Bullet, I accidentally discovered what real motorcycle ownership was all about. Something I would have never been able to experience if I had stuck with modern machines.

hutch

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #20 on: October 07, 2007, 03:14:19 AM »

Deejay, thanks for letting me know that not all the younger generation has lost their sense. One thing you should know is that the new Triumph has no dealings whatso ever with the old company. They can't even get you parts for the old ones. They also had to use a 800cc motor to keep up with the Japanese 650cc bike that came out 2 years earlier, and looks more like a Triumph than the new Triumphs do. Also,there is always excitement during chaos..........usually followed by despair.      I hope I am wrong.   Hutch

I know about the new triumph bonnevilles all too well, that was my 1st motorcycle, before the Bullet. I sold it after 1 year of trying to tinker with it. The new bonnevilles seem to be doing well regardless, even though I didn't like it... I guess i'm just not normal. Oh, and I also agree about the Kawasaki W650 (if thats the jap bike you were referring to)... I remember parking my new Bonneville next to one and thinking the W650 looked much more correct.

It is a shame though about the Bullet, I accidentally discovered what real motorcycle ownership was all about. Something I would have never been able to experience if I had stuck with modern machines.
I just bought a low miles W650 about a 2 months ago. I went all the way from Michigan to Wisconsin to get it. About 3000 miles of saddle time tells me I should have bought one back in 2000 when I was window shopping. So far of all the bikes I have owned in 40+ years it is the best combination of smoothness, looks, handling,ride and it performs right with the 800cc Triumph,, and HD Sportster. They have a comparison of all 3 bikes being road tested by the same people the same day here on the internet somewhere. Being the smallest cc bike of the 3 made it shine to me. Owning one proved it.The only thing I don't like is the electronic ignition. I have never been stranded on a bike with points. Can't say that about the electronic ones I have owned. It was just to bad that Kawasaki decided to quit exporting them to the US after only 3 years.The people in Europe can still get new ones.That is why I was going to sell my Bullet and several other bikes I have. I just got to many bikes. I changed my mind about the Bullet Classic as soon as I seen how long the "lean burn" is going to last and be replaced by another "new" idea.  Sorry Kevin and everybody. I am getting way off topic.      Hutch
« Last Edit: October 07, 2007, 03:45:21 AM by hutch »
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donkey

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #21 on: October 07, 2007, 04:55:31 PM »
I'am still thinking that this means the real end of the Bullet, 'cause a Bullet is over all, his pre-unit motor. Upgrade and modernized is allways welcome, but this new bikes there will no Bullets, in my opinion. Is like the BMW Mini, or the new injected Bonneville. Bullets is for purist, isn't it?
In this case of international green laws, and moderns upgrades and evolutions I think the best choice is rebirth the 700 Interceptor or Meteor with a Kawasaki W650 style motor... (W650 'cause still have kick start, of course). That's all, in a few weeks I will have my Bullet, my real Bullet, maybe the last of a legend (I check the engine number, jajaja)
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dave48

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #22 on: October 07, 2007, 05:25:06 PM »
" but triumph did what they could to please the purists, and updated the product. "

Triumph did neither well - and folded big time!
Hinckley Triumphs were (and are as far as I know) the result of long term planning and investement by a "businessman" - NOT a m'cycle industry guy at all (a property developer, house and factory builder actually). The bit of what was left of Triumph post-Meriden that DID pass to a m'cycle enthusiast had neither the investment nor the trade and patent rights to do more than carry on with Meriden Bonnies etc - didn't last too long either!

LotusSevenMan

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #23 on: October 07, 2007, 06:54:49 PM »
Do you know how Triumphs are put together?
Try this clip. Requires sound!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKEuzxC4eGc

 ::)
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exiledcarper

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #24 on: October 07, 2007, 07:35:53 PM »
That is 'kin hilararious!!! ;D

dave48

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #25 on: October 07, 2007, 08:06:14 PM »
Nice one (or three).

hutch

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2007, 10:17:00 PM »
LMAO, Way funny. Those guys deserve an award.   Hutch
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Kevin Mahoney

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #27 on: October 07, 2007, 10:29:08 PM »
Royal Enfield took a hard look at reviving the Series II Interceptor engine for all of the obvious reasons. They concluded that it could not be made to run clean enough and would not meet modern day reliability standards. On the otherhand maybe a look alike would have been a good idea. As has been mentioned Kawasaki did a great job of building a motor that looked right while being modren. Note that it was not a visual copy of any particular motlr, but rather it took visual cues from several old Brit motors
« Last Edit: October 08, 2007, 02:07:40 AM by Royal Enfield 1 »

hutch

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2007, 10:56:13 PM »
Royal Enfield took a hard look at reviving the Series II Interceptor engine for all of the obvious reasons. They concluded that it could not be made to run clean enough and would not meet modern day reliability standards. On the otherhand maybe a look alike would have been a good idea. As has been mentioned Kawasaki did a great job of building a motor that looked right while being modren. Note that it was not a visual copy of any particular motlr, but rather it took visual cues from several ol Brit motors
What I liked was when you look at one side of the Kawasaki motor it reminded you of a Triumph with the tear drop cover on the wrong side. If you look at the other side, the cam drive looked similar to a 60's Ducati bevel head 350 or 450 Scrambler. I always wanted one of those back in the 60's also.    Hutch
« Last Edit: October 07, 2007, 10:59:33 PM by hutch »
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LJRead

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Re: End of a myth
« Reply #29 on: October 08, 2007, 06:25:12 PM »
From the points brought up here, the three main changes in the new engine are EFI, hydraulic lifters, and the integrated transmission.  Will the hydraulic lifters reduce emissions by that much and from a view of engine safely, are they better or worse (is there much of a problem of sticking)?  I can't see the they would reduce emissions by that much.  If not, then couldn't the fuel injection have been added to the classic or AVL engine as it is to meet European requirements. Then we could have stuck back on a carburetor and gone our own way.

The integrated transmission, as is the case with so many "modernizations",  may have made the engine cheaper to build;  does it make it easier to repair or more reliable? I don't know, just asking.