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Author Topic: Traditionalist  (Read 5053 times)

RagMan

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Traditionalist
« on: October 17, 2007, 02:50:24 AM »
Today, I went into the local Honda dealer, to get prices for a friend, and got to chatting with the bored salesman. Got round to talking about my bikes, and I told him I have an Enfield, and he looked shocked, and turned to go, muttering 'ah, a traditionalist' 

It was like the presence of an Enfield in my stable, made me something not to talk to. :o

I overheard him pushing another bike - the Honda everso big crotch rocket thing - 'Oh, we never see these, used.' This he said, with a smile on his face.  I had heard the explanation as to why there were no used ones, from an insurance agent friend of mine.

Something my friend heard, whilst getting her endorsement put on her licence.  'We don't usually see people getting this endorsement - mostly they just get a permit, and renew it when it expires. '  So rare, indeed, was the adding of the endorsement, that the office had difficulty in getting it right. . .

Armed with that little snippet, I called my friend, the insurance agent.  'Oh, Yes, ' he said, when I told him of the comments I had heard. ' We void nearly every policy where a powerful sport bike is involved in a wreck -  the rider is usually not licensed. The dealer will finance a bike, for them, without checking to see if they have a motorcycle endorsement.'

I think, I would rather be a traditionalist, than not. It seems, we traditionalists are more responsible.
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

dave48

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2007, 08:24:57 AM »
Apologies for language difference, but what are "endorsements" and "permits"? Here in UK an "endorsement" is the common term for a record of convictions for driving offences, noted on your Driving Licence.
I'm guessing that a "permit" is what we call a licence? Is an "endorsement" an addition that allows a m'cycle?
Sounds as if your insurance requirements are rather different also!

RagMan

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2007, 01:45:03 PM »
Endorsement is the extra qualification on a license, like motorcycle, or lorry etc.

Permit, is provisional license. 
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

luoma

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2007, 03:31:46 PM »
Sounds like the salesman's idea of a traditionalist is someone who rides for the sheer enjoyment of motorcycling, rather than buy an overpowered race bike as a fashion accessory. Whenever I hear or read of a motorcycle fatality, it is usually some guy, first-time rider, who purchased a crotch rocket because his friends have one and he thinks he'll look cool on it.

I've ridden my share of fast bikes, and liked them, but even then, I rode for the joy of it. I'm glad I'm older now (and a traditionalist). I heard that when a young man rides, he picks a destination and just goes. When an old man rides, he picks a direction and just goes.

Foggy_Auggie

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2007, 04:35:48 PM »
I heard that when a young man rides, he picks a destination and just goes. When an old man rides, he picks a direction and just goes.

Very true words here!

Regards, Foggy
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RagMan

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2007, 04:56:18 PM »
That is my main difference - I have never been the guy with a destination, more the guy who rides forever. The journey is always better than the arrival.  Since my teens, I have just climbed on and gone.  I very rarely get to the original idea place, usually something looks nicer, be it a rain cloud I am avoiding, or a road out of the direct sunlight. I am proud to be the traditionalist I am classified as - the Bullet is an extension of my wanderlust - It goes where ever I point it, doesn't need to be blacktop, doesn't need to be a road even. Same with all the early British bikes I have had - they didn't need the road either.  Crotch Rockets do not do well on dirt, and forget taking a cruiser - they are a pure dog to ride on gravel.  I have ridden a heavy Harley on a firm dirt road, and it was not a comfortable experience.

Around here, 90% of the roads are dirt, and they transition between dirt and hard with no warning. Often I see motorcyclists out for the ride, slamming everything on, because the good road they were riding, turned to dirt. The Bullet just hunkers down a bit, spreads her tires a little wider, and keeps on going. She may wag her tail a bit, but that is just to let me know she knows the road changed, and never more than once.

I cannot wait to get my foot mended, the new ignition fitted, a good carb tune, the disk brake fitted, and go for a ride..  I spent time a couple of days ago, in the barn, and just hung out with my bike..
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

dave48

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2007, 06:33:30 PM »
"Around here, 90% of the roads are dirt, ...."

Can I live there, please, can I, can I, please.....???

LJRead

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2007, 08:13:52 PM »
"I cannot wait to get ...the disc brake fitted"  Traditionalist?

RagMan

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2007, 08:36:37 PM »
Yes, traditionalist.. I have the tradition of enjoying stopping. I am not, and never have been someone who can restore a vehicle to it's design parameter - it may have a seat I don't like, or the power may be wrong, or the tires suck..  With my Bullet, the front brake is worthless - it stops, but it takes one heck of a long time doing it - the disk brake is a good system, safer than drum, and does nothing to detract from my enjoyment of my bike.

Some folk like to ride around bereft the benefit of modern ideas..  Fine by me, go for it, just don't mind if I don't agree - the disk brake makes the bike even safer, just as changing the ignition to a fool proof electronic - I was, until recently, dead set against electronic ignitions. It is strange how long term pain will change your mind.
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

deejay

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2007, 11:49:20 PM »
Yes, traditionalist.. I have the tradition of enjoying stopping. I am not, and never have been someone who can restore a vehicle to it's design parameter - it may have a seat I don't like, or the power may be wrong, or the tires suck..  With my Bullet, the front brake is worthless - it stops, but it takes one heck of a long time doing it - the disk brake is a good system, safer than drum, and does nothing to detract from my enjoyment of my bike.

Some folk like to ride around bereft the benefit of modern ideas..  Fine by me, go for it, just don't mind if I don't agree - the disk brake makes the bike even safer, just as changing the ignition to a fool proof electronic - I was, until recently, dead set against electronic ignitions. It is strange how long term pain will change your mind.

Hey before you swap for a disk have you tried adjusting the front drum? Mine was set up from the dealer so well that I could do stoppies on it if I wanted. I've adjusted mine once and they still work almost as well. I think there are instructions in the snidal manual for angling the pads in a way for most effective grip.


LJRead

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2007, 01:11:36 AM »
IndianaBulleteer - You are alright, in my book, a little inconsistent maybe, but who of us isn't?

Foggy_Auggie

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2007, 01:19:10 AM »
Yep, my front drum brake is as good as a single disc brake.  

And has no master or slave hydraulic cylinders to start leaking at the worst possible time.  Or pads that lock up solid after getting ready for Spring riding.  Or high pressure hoses that weather crack and need replacements so they won't burst on a panic stop.  Or accidently spilling hydraulic fluid on a beautiful painted gas tank.

All the above has happened to me over the years.  I'd rather just worry about a cable and end ferrules.

Regards, Foggy
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RagMan

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2007, 03:48:53 AM »
Stop scaring me guys, I already have the disc brake kit.. :)

Hey Dave 48 - another strange language thing.. If we get a ticket, it is a citation - and will cost money..  what you call an endorsement.
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

LotusSevenMan

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2007, 06:29:35 AM »
IB.
Yep, an endorsement on our licence is something NOT to have in the UK.
We get points. Three points and sixty ukp (120 US Dollars) fine for speeding. Four of those and your license goes for a period of time set by the courts normally six months.
See below. Is it as bad Stateside?


 Totting Up Driving Ban
12 Penalty Points

 
The penalty points system was introduced in an attempt to provide the Courts with another method of punishing motorists apart from the original fine and driving ban option. In this way, the Court could endorse a person's driving licence with the number of points it felt appropriate, given the severity of the offence. It also allowed the introduction of a system that was able to monitor the effect the punishments were having, resulting in the potential to ban motorists who continued to commit driving offences on a regular basis.
   
How does the totting up procedure work?
The number of penalty points varies on the nature of the motoring offence. The more serious the driving offence, the higher the number of points. The minimum number of points for the most minor offences is 2 points, whilst offences such as failing to comply with a traffic light carry a non–discretionary 3 points and other offences have a range of points which allows the Magistrates to vary the punishment depending on the severity of the incident. For example, speeding ranges from 3 to 6 points. Speeding offences dealt with by Fixed Penalty Notices will have a standard 3 points whereas more serious speeding cases which are dealt with at Court can result in up to 6 points being endorsed on the convicted driver's licence. Another common offence, driving without due care, carries a range of 3–9 points, again dependent on the circumstances of the case.

Should a driver reach 12 points in a 3 year period, the Court guidelines are an automatic disqualification of 6 months should be imposed.

Totting up disqualifications can arise where:
A party has been convicted of several offences over the course of a 3 year period (or has committed the offences within a 3 year period); or


Where 2 or more offences have been committed at the same time and upon conviction the number of points endorsed on the licence amount to 12 or more. Consequently, a driver with a clean licence who commits 2 offences that both carry 6 or more points could face a totting up disqualification if convicted of both offences. 
 
 
How long does a totting up ban last for?
The mandatory period of disqualification for a totting up ban is 6 months. Some Courts do exercise discretion and there are examples of 3 months being imposed but in theory, if you reach 12 points, and cannot convince the Court that you should be allowed to keep your licence, you are off the road for 6 months.
 
How long do penalty points/offences remain on my driving licence?
Points are valid for 3 years from the date of conviction but cannot be removed from your licence until their fourth anniversary. If you amass 12 points in any 3 year period, you face disqualification.

 :(
   
 
 
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RagMan

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2007, 12:54:02 PM »
I don't know the penalty system, I have never fallen foul of it. But I have a a bunch of endorsements. My license is a class A, with Motorcycles - on the back it says:

1: any vehicle: or combination of vehicles, over 26,000 pounds, except motorcycles.
2: Tank trailers, double and triple trailers.
3: Two & Three wheel motorcycles.

Being a 'HGV' license, I have stricter restrictions on alcohol in my blood - but can get less penalty for speeding. Here an HGV license  is called a CDL, class A is for articulated, (semi) trailers.

When I lived in Britain, I drove under a Forces License, so never had to do the pointless driving test there. I had friends who had to do it, and failed ten times before finally being able to drive bad enough to pass the thing.

When I traveled in Britain as a child and youth, I did not have a license, and never got caught.
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

LJRead

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2007, 06:32:32 PM »
Got my motorcycle"endorsement" here in Tonga.  Took less than five minutes, cost about $5 U.S. and I was out the door.  Of course I built my house with no permits at all so things don't have to be as complicated as the bureaus make them.

hutch

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2007, 08:32:44 PM »
Yep, my front drum brake is as good as a single disc brake.  

And has no master or slave hydraulic cylinders to start leaking at the worst possible time.  Or pads that lock up solid after getting ready for Spring riding.  Or high pressure hoses that weather crack and need replacements so they won't burst on a panic stop.  Or accidently spilling hydraulic fluid on a beautiful painted gas tank.

All the above has happened to me over the years.  I'd rather just worry about a cable and end ferrules.

Regards, Foggy
Thank you for that refreshing comment Foggy. You can always tell who has been riding for years and beginners sold into the "works better, less maintainance line" The same people that fed them that line forgot to mention that the new set up is also more expensive to replace and more things can go wrong with them.  I remember my cousin Mike had a Japanese bike with disc brake and the piston would stick in the caliper. He would touch the brake let off and start a turn only to have the front tire slide out, and down he would go. After about three times I asked him when he was going to fix that. "SOMEDAY" I told him I could fix it for him right now. I slid a pipe over his break lever and broke it off. He never did fix the caliperpiston. Too expensive compared to a cable. He usually rode old Triumphs with drum brakes.  Hutch
« Last Edit: October 18, 2007, 08:50:07 PM by hutch »
You learn from your mistakes, and I have LEARNED a lot.

Kevin Mahoney

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2007, 10:15:50 PM »
We at Classic Motorworks often wonder how many of todays customers even want to fool with their bikes. Without making any value judgements we suspect not too many. Royal Enfield customers are the best because on average they have an honest dealer who has told them up front that this is a bike that requires "owner involvement". The absolute beauty of the Bullet is that anyone who can read or dial the phone, (given the courage to try), can fix anything on the bike. We have talked countless self-proclaimed "mechanically challenged" or "I have never touched a screwdriver"  types through complex repairs on the phone. The wonderful feeling of accomplishment they get when they are finished is very gratifying to us.
  For me personally, the mechanical aspects of the Bullet or any other motorcycle or car for that matter, outweigh my desire to ride or drive them. I love the chase and the mechanical challenges.
  Having said all of that, there are probably way more people who prefer to just ride their bikes and not worry about the mechanical aspects. It is hard to be very critical of that sort of thinking. We see this with some of the Electra riders. For us it is good as it widens out market, but it also means that those customers are less willing to take on mechanical challenges and buy performance changing accessories.
  I guess the best part is that this diversity fuels this type of thread on countless boards.

t120rbullet

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2007, 10:26:10 PM »
Regards, Foggy
Thank you for that refreshing comment Foggy. You can always tell who has been riding for years and beginners sold into the "works better, less maintainance line" The same people that fed them that line forgot to mention that the new set up is also more expensive to replace and more things can go wrong with them.  I remember my cousin Mike had a Japanese bike with disc brake and the piston would stick in the caliper. He would touch the brake let off and start a turn only to have the front tire slide out, and down he would go. After about three times I asked him when he was going to fix that. "SOMEDAY" I told him I could fix it for him right now. I slid a pipe over his break lever and broke it off. He never did fix the caliperpiston. Too expensive compared to a cable. He usually rode old Triumphs with drum brakes.  Hutch
[/quote]

My ElectraGlide,,,,,,2 quad piston calipers on the front and in all of Harley's infinite wisdom they built em without dust wipers or seals on the pistons. Every spring I have to take em off,pump em up until I can get all the stuck pistons out and clean em with a toothbrush and brake cleaner, put it back together and bleed it. 
My 99 Bullet still has the stock cable on it!  Works every time too!
It's amazing how they had down pat 50 yrs ago and now they design-in job security.
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hutch

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2007, 10:29:45 PM »

  For me personally, the mechanical aspects of the Bullet or any other motorcycle or car for that matter, outweigh my desire to ride or drive them. I love the chase and the mechanical challenges.
 
Kevin, that quote was beautiful, and sums up my feelings. When I was a kid I used to tear everything apart to see how it worked. I love tearing car and bike motors apart, and have been doing it for years. Nothing gives me more satisfaction than to tear something down to its bare components, fix the problem, and put it back together. When I hear it fire up and purr again the feeling is undescribable. I guess I am just a gearhead.    Hutch
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hutch

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2007, 11:02:22 PM »
Regards, Foggy
Thank you for that refreshing comment Foggy. You can always tell who has been riding for years and beginners sold into the "works better, less maintainance line" The same people that fed them that line forgot to mention that the new set up is also more expensive to replace and more things can go wrong with them.  I remember my cousin Mike had a Japanese bike with disc brake and the piston would stick in the caliper. He would touch the brake let off and start a turn only to have the front tire slide out, and down he would go. After about three times I asked him when he was going to fix that. "SOMEDAY" I told him I could fix it for him right now. I slid a pipe over his break lever and broke it off. He never did fix the caliperpiston. Too expensive compared to a cable. He usually rode old Triumphs with drum brakes.  Hutch

My ElectraGlide,,,,,,2 quad piston calipers on the front and in all of Harley's infinite wisdom they built em without dust wipers or seals on the pistons. Every spring I have to take em off,pump em up until I can get all the stuck pistons out and clean em with a toothbrush and brake cleaner, put it back together and bleed it. 
My 99 Bullet still has the stock cable on it!  Works every time too!
It's amazing how they had down pat 50 yrs ago and now they design-in job security.
[/quote]T120r bullet, I know what you mean. Only 2 of my bikes get to reside in the warm house during the cold Michigan winters. The ones that set in the garage and have disc brakes are a pain every spring. Stuck calipers, rusted rotors and squeeking brakes if they aren't froze up. A few months ago I got a old Triumph Cub running for my neighbors grandson. It hadn't been driven since 1970. I cleaned and sealed the rusted tank which took the most time. I pulled and cleaned the carb, ran a point file through the 37 year old points used the original plug from who knows when, changed the oil, and replaced a dry rotted fuel line. 6 kicks later it was running. I couldn't even imagine how long it would take to get the disc brakes to work, if ever on a new bike stored in a barn for 37 years. My cousin put his Bike in my barn for 6 years and it wouldn't even roll when he decided to come get it. We used a chain fall to load it in his truck. I wonder how many of these new bikes will be found in a barn somewhere in 30 years that will be considered a cheap fixer upper.     Hutch
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Foggy_Auggie

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2007, 11:45:14 PM »
Thanks guys for the back up on my post!

Still new here and kind of feeling out the temperment and tone of the regulars.  I thought I might get blasted (or flamed as the newer generation calls it)!

Regards, Foggy
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RagMan

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2007, 11:46:54 PM »
I just managed to fix the Harley today - it had 271 miles on it, and is two years old. Chasing electrical problems around a bike so tightly crammed together was not fun - But, even though the thing sat for a year in the rain, has rust on the suspension, and sun damage to the seat, the disc brakes were not locked up, nor did they grab - I got it started eventually - it did not want to play, and I was thinking maybe something else was messed up, but it started, and I reckoned the discs would be seized, but nope - squeaked a bit for the first pull at the end of the driveway, but no grabbing, heating up, or noise for the ride.

I am glad to have been able to fix that bike - bought used from a Dealer, as a return from a guy that didn't like it. I reckon the Dealer didn't check it before he sold it on. A brand new bike now with 280 miles on it, shouldn't have needed a complete wiring check, replacing connectors, and going through two new batteries.  Hopefully the battery I bought today will not fry like the first two, I spent enough time with a multimeter checking everything, so maybe it won't.

Now all I need is the funds, and I will stick a sidecar on it.
aka Indiana Bulleteer.
''99 Classic Bullet. '05 Ural Tourist sidecar rig, converted to 2wd. '05 Harley Davidson Sportster.
Jefferson County, WA

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2007, 09:03:35 AM »
Cooking batteries? Sounds like a Honda VTR!!!
They burn out their rectifiers (literally) and as they are placed under the seat are know as 'rectumfriers' for obvious reasons.  :o
Most of us change them for the far superior (as it has lots of cooling fins) Yamaha R1/R6 units!! Maybe you have a problem in that dept?
Good Luck
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hutch

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2007, 01:27:15 PM »

They burn out their rectifiers (literally) and as they are placed under the seat are know as 'rectumfriers' for obvious reasons.  :o

 
I never did understand the logic of putting a rectifier under the seat. I put a solo on my Bullet so no problem. On my Savage I relocated it to the side of the rear fender in front of the shock where it was in the airstream for better cooling.   Hutch
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deejay

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2007, 01:51:01 PM »

They burn out their rectifiers (literally) and as they are placed under the seat are know as 'rectumfriers' for obvious reasons.  :o

 
I never did understand the logic of putting a rectifier under the seat. I put a solo on my Bullet so no problem. On my Savage I relocated it to the side of the rear fender in front of the shock where it was in the airstream for better cooling.   Hutch

This is kind of a newbie question, but do they really get that hot? Mine are under my solo seat as well, and I've made a point to feel them after a ride, and they don't seem to get hot at all.

hutch

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #26 on: October 19, 2007, 02:49:23 PM »
I never really checked the ones on my Bullet, but I took the rear section of my seat off on my Savage to run a solo look and the rectifier is so hot it burnt my arm one day leaving a real nice "fin" pattern. I know the old Zeiner Diode on Triumphs got that hot also. When I build a bike I always mount my rectifier/regulator in the air stream. I guess I will have to check the ones on my Bullet.    Hutch
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HRAB

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #27 on: October 19, 2007, 04:26:03 PM »
[snip]  For me personally, the mechanical aspects of the Bullet or any other motorcycle or car for that matter, outweigh my desire to ride or drive them. I love the chase and the mechanical challenges.
 [snip]

I love to ride and to wrench.
The dilema: if I am wrenching then I can't ride the bike.
The answer: A bike to commute and a bike to wrench.

For commuting I have an old rat K100RT on which I put about 12K mi/yr. It seems to be happy as long as I supply gas, tires, oil, and the all important spline lube (even Beemers have thier weakness's). It is unmodified with exception of driving lights, a sheepskin seat pad, and a JC Whitney top box.

For Wrenching the elegant simplicity of the Royal Enfields make them a joy to maintain and modify. Then when I finish saying that I need to confess. Last year I bought at an Insurance Auction, a '90 BMW K100LT that had been hit and declared totaled. My plan was for it to be a parts bike for the '86 (my wife named it "The Mistress"...'cause it was 21, fast, and dirty'.) When I got the '90 home I discovered it was actually in pretty good shape, better than "The Mistress" ...but no title. Then I did the foolish thing. I found a '87 frame with a clean title on the internet and well, you can quess the rest.

The project took all winter. This bike requires the frame to be lifed from the top of the power assembly. Lifting the frame requires removing all the faring, the complete steering assembly, dozens of electrical connections including the essential things line 4 way flasher, temp and oil pressure guages, electric fuel pump, mass air sensor, the usual safety interlocks, the radar detector, the radio, and the accessories plugs.

In the spring it was ready for the road with only one glitch: The ABS Brakes were not functioning. I have great standard brakes, but can't find the gremlin in the ABS electronics. My son sort of adopted it for our trips to the race track and named it "Frankenbike".
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tinboatcapt/sets/72157600545562204/

"Frankenbike and The Mistress"... sounds like a B Movie!

And my neighbors can't figure out why I drive the shops Electra home so often!
jim
BMWMOA www.bmwmoa.com
Iron Butt Association www.ironbutt.com/about/default.cfm
(Formerly) CRA# 118N www.cra-mn.com (I got smarter in old age)

t120rbullet

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #28 on: October 19, 2007, 05:48:36 PM »
drum brakes.  Hutch
T120r bullet, I know what you mean. Only 2 of my bikes get to reside in the warm house during the cold Michigan winters.
[/quote]

Doesn't everyone in Michigan have a heated garage!!!!!!!!!!!
1999 Enfield 500 Black Deluxe "Silver"
2012 Concours 14 (no name yet)
2013 Royal Star Venture S  "Jelly Roll"

LotusSevenMan

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #29 on: October 19, 2007, 07:24:04 PM »
The Bullet rectifier and regulator are finned and when used with the solo saddle are as exposed to fresh air as you'd ever want in their normal Classic underseat position!!!

Heated garages? Geez I'd just like a garage. A gazebo is as near as I get in this part of the UK. Bl%dy freezin' today while working outside on a Kawasaki two stroke screamer.
If it ain't broke-------------------------- fix it 'till it is!

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Ducati 916 'L' twin

hutch

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Re: Traditionalist
« Reply #30 on: October 19, 2007, 10:55:11 PM »
drum brakes.  Hutch
T120r bullet, I know what you mean. Only 2 of my bikes get to reside in the warm house during the cold Michigan winters.

Doesn't everyone in Michigan have a heated garage!!!!!!!!!!!

[/quote] Well it was another one of those "Fickle Finger of Fate" things for me. I paid off my motgage and extended my Equity line just enough for my 32 x 60 pole barn garage to be built. My contractor quoted me a price for the garage with full concrete floor and I would have enough left for the electrical. Then I planned on saving up my pennies to insulate, finish drywall the inside and put in heat. One problem, for some reason I came home and only part of the garage was concrete. Seems he misunderstood me somehow, so it is now 3 years later and I am still running off an extension chord for power because I spent the power money on the rest of the concrete. No finished inside, no heat. I just got enough money back on my EQ, and the Fickle Finger struck again,I just put a new roof on my house. I'm still standing on my vice and running into the spare bedroom to use my bench mount drill press. I'm using a 110 wire welder while my Lincoln welder sits in the corner of the garage with no 220 to plug it into. It will be a long time before I get heat in the garage at this rate. Someone on this forum said that I could be the poster boy for bad luck, and that isn't far off.       Hutch
« Last Edit: October 19, 2007, 10:59:02 PM by hutch »
You learn from your mistakes, and I have LEARNED a lot.