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Author Topic: Where did the UCE come from?  (Read 580 times)

Rusty

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Where did the UCE come from?
« on: August 06, 2009, 02:27:25 AM »
Whilst cleaning my C5 the other day I noticed a number of casting features on the cylinder head which were unused and hadnít been machined. Things like a second spark plug hole (or de-compressor hole?) and what appeared to be unions for external oilways. Also the valve lifter cover on the crankcase is still present but Iím not sure it can be taken off.

I was always under the impression that the UCE engine was a completely new design (and so the last mechanical link with Enfields of old had sadly gone) but could it be that some old moulds and tooling have been dusted off and re-used?

Would be nice to think that the connection is still there.

ace.cafe

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Re: Where did the UCE come from?
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2009, 06:54:10 AM »
There are other models in India which use this engine.

I think the location for the 2nd spark plug is used on the "Thunderbird Twin Spark", which is an India home-market model.

Don't know what the external oil line connections might be for.

It is a new engine design, but it is used on different models, and some of them are home-market models which have different features than the export models do.
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Lmundy

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Re: Where did the UCE come from?
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2009, 04:13:07 PM »
I say never discount the ability to turn your scooter, in a pinch, to a high-volume air pump, a stationary generator, an oil pump, or (with appropriate replacement rear wheel) a grain thresher.  The more fittings and connections, the better.