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Author Topic: Service manual for the G5/C5  (Read 4160 times)

Chris-G5

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2010, 09:38:01 PM »
It is essentially a potentiometer and it controls the amount of air flowing into the engine in response to throttle opening.
Quote


TPS controls the amount of air?

ScooterBob

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2010, 09:44:01 PM »
""I am a little disappointed that the UCE has hydraulic lifters.  British singles should tick when running.  Otherwise how do you know it's working right? ""

Don't worry  -  it ticks regardless........    ;)

Will - This will go away in about 1500 miles - or with the use of 10W oils. The "tick" in the new engine is the tight, tight, TIGHT lifters only pumping down after the rest of the valve-train slaps the crap out of them. After they get a little looser, they are DEAD quiet .... almost like there are no parts in it at all. It's an interesting phenomenon on that engine in part due to the India boys building them TIGHT - like they used to - but with new metallurgy, so it takes longer to wear in.
Spare the pig iron - spoil the part!

r80rt

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2010, 09:44:51 PM »
""I am a little disappointed that the UCE has hydraulic lifters.  British singles should tick when running.  Otherwise how do you know it's working right? ""

Don't worry  -  it ticks regardless........    ;)
Yeah, it does but just in the right way ;)
On the eighth day God created the C5, and it was better looking than anything on the planet.
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ScooterBob

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2010, 09:47:39 PM »
It is essentially a potentiometer and it controls the amount of air flowing into the engine in response to throttle opening.
Quote


TPS controls the amount of air?

U-u-u-u-h, no ...... The Throttle Position Sensor indicates the degree of throttle opening to the processor by varying the monitor voltage.
Spare the pig iron - spoil the part!

Kevin Mahoney

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2010, 10:16:16 PM »
oops, typing too fast. I stand corrected.

Chris-G5

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2010, 12:52:28 AM »
U-u-u-u-h, no ...... The Throttle Position Sensor indicates the degree of throttle opening to the processor by varying the monitor voltage.

Exactly, just wanted Kevin to correct his mistake. ;D

Chris-G5

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2010, 12:52:54 AM »
oops, typing too fast. I stand corrected.
;D

Ducati Scotty

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2010, 03:19:24 AM »
Mistakes?  Meh.  I knew where you were going.

Another funny thing on the hydraulic lifters...

The Honda Nighthawk has them too.  The bike requires almost no maintenance, runs as smooth as a sewing machine, and will run forever if you just change the oil.  It's the most soulless machine I've ever ridden.  Great for reliability but just nothing to draw you in.  The REs are just the opposite, getting more reliable and lower maintenance all the time but still loads of character.  As the local dealer described the update UCE bike, "They updated everything they should have and left the rest alone."

Scott

singhg5

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2010, 04:13:23 AM »
I think you just answered most of my questions, or at least got me on the right track. I know how to adjust TPS with a voltmeter. ...... Earlier Ducatis have this setup

Scott:

Can you elaborate in step-wise detail how you adjust TPS by a voltmeter ?  Don,t just suggest to Google it   ;)
« Last Edit: June 12, 2010, 04:42:17 AM by singhg5 »
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WillW

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #24 on: June 12, 2010, 07:18:08 AM »
Will - This will go away in about 1500 miles - or with the use of 10W oils. The "tick" in the new engine is the tight, tight, TIGHT lifters only pumping down after the rest of the valve-train slaps the crap out of them. After they get a little looser, they are DEAD quiet .... almost like there are no parts in it at all. It's an interesting phenomenon on that engine in part due to the India boys building them TIGHT - like they used to - but with new metallurgy, so it takes longer to wear in.

Well I clocked 3002 miles last night just as I pulled into the home lane. And yes the ticking is now much quieter. But is it getting generally noisier? Probably not, just differently perceived. Of course now that all my attention isn't taken up with just staying out of hospital (40 years without a bike remember...) I'm more aware of all the other engine sounds, but I don't hear anything worrying. Oh, and I'm using Silkolene 15-50. It was in the bike when new so I carry on with it.
3000 miles in eleven weeks  -  keep an eye on that rear view mirror Singh  -  I think I'm catching up with you......   :D
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Ducati Scotty

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #25 on: June 12, 2010, 02:04:18 PM »
On older Ducatis, you close the throttle, measure the voltage at the TPS, rotate it to get the prescribed voltage for your model, and then tighten the set screws.  The computer is set up to know that X volts means throttle closed.  I'm guessing the RE is something similar.

Scott


singhg5

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #26 on: June 12, 2010, 03:33:35 PM »
Do you have a specific question about the injection system? It is so simple that we can probably answer it right here. There is a description and some specifications of pages 06-6 and 06-7 in the factory manual. There is no maintenance to be done to the TPS.

Here are two pictures of Throttle Body Module -

The first is from the Left Side of Motorcycle

Second is from Right Side of Motorcycle.

Which Sensor is TPS and Which is MAP sensor ?

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ScooterBob

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #27 on: June 12, 2010, 04:06:50 PM »
Mistakes?  Meh.  I knew where you were going.

Another funny thing on the hydraulic lifters...

The Honda Nighthawk has them too.  The bike requires almost no maintenance, runs as smooth as a sewing machine, and will run forever if you just change the oil.  It's the most soulless machine I've ever ridden.  Great for reliability but just nothing to draw you in.  The REs are just the opposite, getting more reliable and lower maintenance all the time but still loads of character.  As the local dealer described the update UCE bike, "They updated everything they should have and left the rest alone."

Scott

The RE still has a "soul" because of all the fellows who still basically HAND BUILD them. Honda's are nice, as you say - but putting 2800 of them together in a day with the "perfect" robotics negates any real character. I've had my hands on more of these machines than probably anyone else in the country - and it amazes me with the little tiny differences that you find from bike to bike - even with consecutive chassis numbers! You can definitely see the human touch on every one - and I like that. The fellows that put these bikes together do so with a LOT of pride - some of them are second (and probably third!) generation Factory workers, so they KNOW what makes the bikes "tick" (literally! Hahaha!) The dealer was right - ALL the  stuff that makes an Enfield, an Enfield was left alone - and all the stuff that made them a bit trying from time to time was improved .... Brilliant! This is why we love them!
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r80rt

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #28 on: June 12, 2010, 04:45:48 PM »
AMEN! Tell it brother Bob, tell it, tell it! :D
« Last Edit: June 12, 2010, 05:10:46 PM by r80rt »
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clubman

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Re: Service manual for the G5/C5
« Reply #29 on: June 12, 2010, 07:20:19 PM »
Well I clocked 3002 miles last night just as I pulled into the home lane. And yes the ticking is now much quieter. But is it getting generally noisier? Probably not, just differently perceived. Of course now that all my attention isn't taken up with just staying out of hospital (40 years without a bike remember...) I'm more aware of all the other engine sounds, but I don't hear anything worrying. Oh, and I'm using Silkolene 15-50. It was in the bike when new so I carry on with it.
3000 miles in eleven weeks  -  keep an eye on that rear view mirror Singh  -  I think I'm catching up with you......   :D

I got mine at the end of November 09 and thought I'd be a sunny Sunday afternoon rider, thus insuring it for 3000m a year. Now it's at 2,800 after 6 months and I have changed the insurance to 6,000 pa. But 3,000 in 11 weeks, wow, that's impressive. The moral of the story for both us is clearly that this bike is more fun that we could ever have imagined. Btw, mine still ticks as well.