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Author Topic: Preserving rubber parts  (Read 2983 times)

LJRead

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Preserving rubber parts
« on: December 29, 2007, 07:43:20 PM »

Because of logistics problems, I will be storing some spare parts including things like rubber manifold, tires and tubes, and maybe a few others.  I know that in storage bike tires tend to degrade and crack, so I am wondering the proper way to store such things.  Is there, for example, something they can be coated with that will protect them?  Or can they be wrapped with something? Hopefully, I won't have to use the spares, but hate to think of going to get something and finding it in worse shape than the original. 

There may also be ways of keeping tires, grips and things in better shape while they are in use on the bike.  Any ideas?

Thumper

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2007, 09:08:17 PM »

Because of logistics problems, I will be storing some spare parts including things like rubber manifold, tires and tubes, and maybe a few others.  I know that in storage bike tires tend to degrade and crack, so I am wondering the proper way to store such things.  Is there, for example, something they can be coated with that will protect them?  Or can they be wrapped with something? Hopefully, I won't have to use the spares, but hate to think of going to get something and finding it in worse shape than the original. 

There may also be ways of keeping tires, grips and things in better shape while they are in use on the bike.  Any ideas?

The Russian rubber on my Urals was the pits; however, I successfully stored many rubber spares long term. I stored o-rings, carb manifolds, gas line, foot peg (and kick start) rubber, suspension bushings, etc. All I did was soak them (dripping) in typical vinyl dressing and then roll them into a paper towel and put them in an *unsealed* plastic bag which I rolled up loosely. I stored them for several years through subfreezing winters to upper 90's (F deg) summers. The paper towels would grow mold and dry out (at which point I'd retreat everything), but the rubber stayed fresh.

I think wax paper would be a good alternative to the plastic bag - but I'd still use the paper towels.

Matt

dogbone

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2008, 02:20:56 PM »
LJ    brake fluid
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LJRead

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2008, 06:49:48 PM »
That's interesting dogbone, how would I prevent evaporation though?  Or is it necessary?  More details?  Thanks! 

Thanks to you also Matt!

exiledcarper

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2008, 03:24:26 AM »
How about a smear or two of good old fashioned grease Larry? I would have thought it would keep your rubber parts in perfect shape and wipe off easily when you come to use them.  I fyou didn't want to use preciuos grease, how about something as simple as pig fat, which I would imagine is easily obtainable down your way?

LJRead

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2008, 06:44:04 PM »
I don't know about the grease idea.  sometimes you read where you should be careful to keep grease off rubber parts because it causes them to break down. Better than pig fat might be mutton fat which is often used on metal tools to prevent corrosion and is an old trick used with marine parts.  It apparently has some built in antioxidants, but some experimentation might be in order to make sure it doesn't cause more damage than it prevents.  I suppose keeping such rubber in a cool place out of the sun might help.

Seems like the sort of thing where either actual experience by someone who has had the problem of storing rubber parts or else a long period of experimentation trying different things would be one way to go, but who has the time for years of experimentation? I should think that the rubber industry itself might have some data, so maybe I'll try a search.

dogbone

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2008, 07:20:31 PM »
 well I guess it would evaporate ::)  but it does work well in brakes !!! maybe silicone fluid  isn't alcohol base ???  also try yak sperm
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Foggy_Auggie

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2008, 09:32:04 PM »
A small chunk of camphor placed in tool boxes will keep steel tools from rusting without coating the tools with anything.  Been used for about 150 years.  I don't know if this will work with rubber components.

I'd just spray them with silicone spray or a lithium (white) grease and try that.  I wouldn't use WD40 - it's not a lubricant and a poor preservative.  It displaces moisture and then evaporates to nothing in about 24 hours.

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dewjantim

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2008, 08:38:54 PM »
I would go with the silicone spray and plastic bags for storage. Just spray the silicone on all rubber parts when you wash your bike. They will stay looking like new.....Dew.
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cyrusb

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2008, 09:10:59 PM »
Doesn't petroleum products act like a solvent to rubber?

Foggy_Auggie

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Re: Preserving rubber parts
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2008, 01:33:20 AM »
Doesn't petroleum products act like a solvent to rubber?

Not brake fluid or power steering fluid.  Plus the rubber has to be of the correct composition.
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