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Author Topic: Lube Brake Cams and Rear Wheel Removal  (Read 1569 times)

Thumper

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Lube Brake Cams and Rear Wheel Removal
« on: January 13, 2008, 10:28:57 PM »
I'm at the 3500 mile maintenace and it calls for lubricating the rear (drum) brake cams. BTW, they needed it. They were dry. I never had the pleasure of removing an RE rear wheel and its brake hub/sprocket assembly before. If you haven't either and want the fun and excitement of two or more hours of figuring out the archaic assemblage for yourself, then read no further. If however, you want step by step instructions so that you can actually sip some beer whilst doing the maintenance, then read on.

Rear Brake Cam Lubrication and: Rear Wheel and Brake-hub/Sprocket Removal

In order to lubricate the brake shoe cams in the brake-hub/sprocket assembly (BHSA) you will need to remove the rear wheel and the BHSA.

1.   Note position of both drive chain cam adjusters (relation of punch mark to stud).
2.   Remove cotter pin and 24mm axle crown nut
3.   Pull out axle from right side. Watch for large spacer and smaller “top hat” spacer to fall out. Smaller “top hat” spacer goes inside dust seal in the hub.
4.   Remove wheel. It helps to have someone lean the bike over to the right.
5.   Remove the 19mm brake stay nut and washer, the larger inner axle nut and the cam adjuster, all from the left side.
6.   Note the position of the brake (rod) adjuster nut and remove it from the rod.
7.   Remove the chain’s master link then the chain from the sprocket.
8.   Push the threaded spacer assembly (TSA) that the large axle nut was on through the hub and out the other (right) side. Watch for the large washer/spacer to fall out from between the swing-arm and the BHSA.

NOTE:
Here is the order of axle parts on the left side:
a)   24mm axle crown nut – fits on axle
b)   larger axle nut – actually threads onto the TSA
c)   chain tension cam adjuster
d)   swing-arm
e)   large washer spacer
f)   BHSA
Here is the order of axle parts on the right side:
a)   Wheel hub
b)   “top hat” spacer inserts into hub
c)   large spacer
d)   swing-arm
e)   chain tension cam adjuster
f)   axle

9.   Remove the BHSA and slide off of the brake rod
10.   Remove brake shoes from sprocket
11.    Remove brake shoes and apply grease (I used drum brake grease). Apply a dab to the springs and to the holes (in the shoes) that they go through. Lubricate cam spindle/axle that runs through to the outside of the housing (which the brake rod linkage attaches to). Reinstall the shoes.
12.   Clean sprocket/brake hub
13.   Lube the pivoting washer that the brake rod goes through and grease the return spring attached to that assembly
14.   Reassemble BHSA
15.   Slide BHSA back over the brake rod.
16.   Insert the TSA through the hub and slide the large washer/spacer back in between the hub and the swing-arm.
17.   Insert brake stay through slot
18.   Push the TSA all the way through the swing-arm (note the flattened sides).
19.   Slide the hub forwards, put the cam adjuster on the TSA and put the large axle nut on loosely.
20.   Rotate the cam adjuster to give slack and reinstall chain and master link.
21.   Set cam adjuster back to original position
22.   Now adjust the chain if needed.
23.   Loosely replace the 19mm brake stay nut and washer.
24.   Replace brake (rod) adjuster nut to approximate original location
25.   Reinsert the “top hat” spacer into the right side of the wheel hub
26.   (Optionally) apply vinyl dressing to the rubber bushings inside the wheel hub.
27.   Place the wheel onto the hub
28.   Put right side large spacer between the hub and swing-arm.
29.   Cam adjuster should still be on the axle. Insert axle through to the other (left) side.
30.   Adjust cam adjuster to match the left side.
31.   Adjust rear brake (rod) adjuster.
32.   Make sure wheel spins freely.
33.   Tighten large axle nut on the TSA
34.   Make sure wheel spins freely.
35.   Tighten smaller 24mm axle crown nut
36.   Make sure wheel spins freely.
37.   Tighten 19mm brake stay nut
38.   Make sure wheel spins freely.
39.   Check chain tension cam adjusters one more time and also chain tension.
40.   Check brake adjustment one more time.
41.   Reinsert cotter pin.
42.   Do a final check of everything.

I'll be putting these into my maintenance notes (see signature below) once the full maintenance is completed.

Matt
« Last Edit: January 15, 2008, 12:04:54 AM by Thumper »

LJRead

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Re: Lube Brake Cams and Rear Wheel Removal
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2008, 07:57:08 AM »

Thanks Matt, this sort of information is very useful.  If it was dry was there any indication of it, and should it have been done sooner?

Thumper

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Re: Lube Brake Cams and Rear Wheel Removal
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2008, 12:25:34 PM »

Thanks Matt, this sort of information is very useful.  If it was dry was there any indication of it, and should it have been done sooner?

No and no. Like my Ural in Russia, I suspect that a minimal amount of grease is applied in India as a matter of economy. It was sufficient for the 3200 miles.

Matt

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Re: Lube Brake Cams and Rear Wheel Removal
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2008, 11:51:31 PM »
Thanks Matt - your post has been printed and added to my Bullet Folder for future reference.

Tom
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Kevin Mahoney

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Re: Lube Brake Cams and Rear Wheel Removal
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2008, 03:33:52 AM »
Somewhere in my past I remember a stick of solid lube for just this purpose. You need to be very careful when using grease in drum brakes. They get hot and you don't want it melting and ending up on the shoes. If you use grease, a very small amount of a very high temperature grease (like a thin film) is all you want. The very same thing applies to the distributor rotor. Use something like Sli-Glyde on your points rubbing block. Here is a good article that explains what I am trying to say:
http://www.aa1car.com/library/2005/ic80560.htm