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Author Topic: K&N air filter testing  (Read 4352 times)

olhogrider

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #45 on: February 14, 2011, 03:59:27 PM »
Those dampers are for sound deadening. Between the Indian need for a quiet engine and the sound requirements world wide, they need to be there. As for strength or cooling, they do no good and possibly some harm. I would pull them, but that's just how I am.

Ducati Scotty

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #46 on: February 20, 2011, 12:12:12 AM »
I flipped the bottom mounting bolt and the Corvair air filter dropped right in. centered and the lid closes without a problem.  It obscures about half of the crankcase vent line but I'm sure that's not a problem, still plenty of room to vent gases.  I guess it's a smidge taller than the stock filter because the standard top plate clamped down nice and tight.  I'm sure it's well sealed.  I'm guessing this means you could order the K&N equivlaent and it would also fit.  Tomorrow I hope to take it for a spin.

Scott

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #47 on: February 20, 2011, 09:25:51 AM »
I flipped the bottom mounting bolt and the Corvair air filter dropped right in. centered and the lid closes without a problem.  It obscures about half of the crankcase vent line but I'm sure that's not a problem, still plenty of room to vent gases.  I guess it's a smidge taller than the stock filter because the standard top plate clamped down nice and tight.  I'm sure it's well sealed.  I'm guessing this means you could order the K&N equivlaent and it would also fit.  Tomorrow I hope to take it for a spin.

Scott

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Ducati Scotty

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #48 on: February 20, 2011, 11:55:18 AM »
Coming.  Give a lazy guy a break ;)

Ducati Scotty

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #49 on: February 20, 2011, 09:27:33 PM »


And in the gallery for posterity: http://www.enfieldmotorcycles.com/forum/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=3328

S&B makes one of their 8 layer reusable filters for the Corvair.  I may have to skip the plastic sealing box and live with some tape so I can have that filter.

http://www.sbfilters.com/s.nl/it.A/id.863/.f

Scott
« Last Edit: February 20, 2011, 09:30:28 PM by Ducati Scotty »

Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #50 on: February 21, 2011, 05:48:08 AM »
I am trying to follow this conversation without a bike or filter to actually look at.  Why is it important to "seal" the filter cover lid with tape o the hinges ?  Doesn't air have to get in somewhere anyway?  Seems to me I have seen other bikes modified with no air filter cover boxes  at all, just a perforated chrmoe basket with perforated panels of the same size as the the air filter unti itself (like automotive air filters ....cake shaped.)   As long as the sealing ring is smug to the base plate so air can;t go around the filter (usually accomplished with a butterfly wing nut securing the whole filter unit with its rubber ring seal pressend against to intake flange ) what does it matter if the box leaks? isn't the box just cosmetic?  Nigel . 

singhg5

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #51 on: February 21, 2011, 09:31:46 AM »


@Scott - you are getting good at taking nice pictures  ;).  Like it.

I know it is already 'tomorrow' and you need a cup of Joe to get going, so I will wait until your next post on its performance  :D.
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Ducati Scotty

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #52 on: February 21, 2011, 09:58:07 AM »
Nigel, unlike most vehicles, the RE pulls air from the inside to the outside of the filter.  The hinge is on the clean side of the air stream.  As such, anything that gets sucked through goes right to the throttle body.

In the above pic the round, small opening in the upper right is the intake manifold.  The fresh air intake is on the back of the box under the filter cover plate.

Singh, performance?  It runs.  No difference from stock as far as I can tell, this is a paper air filter.  I think it may be a bit less peppy at higher speeds than it was with the cone filter.

Scott


Ducati Scotty

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #54 on: February 21, 2011, 10:57:58 AM »
Hmmm.....

I just topped up the tank after changing to the new filter, 56.5 mpg.  That was with the S&B cone filter.  It was only two gallons but maybe I need to re-install and run a few more tanks to check if it really is throwing the mileage off.

Scott

Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #55 on: February 21, 2011, 11:10:31 AM »
Maybe this has already been addressed, but is there any possibility of losing the whole air filter housing , mounting an intake pipe right to the intake maniforld and installing an exposed tubular /cylinder type filter in it's own chrome housing (picture something the size and shape of an oversized  elongated coke can, or about the size of an automotive oil filter) with mesh containg the filter element sucking from the outside in?   I wouldn't know where to look for such a thing, but it seems to me that I have seen things like this on various custom bikes .  Could look kinda cool too; -chrome end caps, stainless mesh.  .  A big enough  cylinder with accordiian pleat paper filter unit might offer enough suface area to lower resistance.    Nigel.


Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #57 on: February 21, 2011, 12:00:53 PM »
Or this

 http://www.santiagochopper.com/shop/details



or this

http://www.santiagochopper.com/shop/details.html?id=517
   You get the idea    outside in direct to maniforld      Sure there would be mounting issues, but as someone saiid on this forum, nothing can't be solved with a torch .  Might even have to chase the intake maniforl right back to cylinder head to effect the plumbing,  but going outside in rather than inside out surely opens a whole realm of possibilities.     I couldn't find an example of the cannister shape I seem to recall, but I am sure they exist.      I didn't look at Brit bike customization sites, but I would be willing to bet that there are similar mods out there for Triumphs/BSAs etc that might just fit right out of the box..        Nigel


Ducati Scotty

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Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #58 on: February 21, 2011, 12:32:20 PM »
I'm trying to keep this low tech, easy, and cheap.  I want everyone to be able to so it witn no cutting or special tools.  I also want to keep the triangle box even if it's not used as an air cleaner, it looks nice.  You might be able to plumb a short manifold up to one of the cone type filters but if you keep the triangle box then there's really not too much room to work with.

Scott

Re: K&N air filter testing
« Reply #59 on: February 21, 2011, 12:58:39 PM »
Guess I came into the middle of an ognoing project without realising the goals.  Apologies.   But, that said , it leaves me with a few other questions.
If, as you say the box leaks, and the flow is from inside out, then that must mean that the air reaching the intake maniforld is not fully cleaned.   It would also mean that the stock set up would look "artificially " free flowing, since some of the incoming air can bypass the resistance of the fillter.  Then that may mean that even if you succeed in the quest for getteing a  freer flow  filte to fit , but simultaneously cure the leak, the only outcome may be cleaner air getting to the engine but no faster (since the total riesistance of the "performance " filter may equal the combined resistances of the stock filter plus the air leak.     Just a thought.    Nigel.   Going direct to intake outside in would give a direct measure of the filter itself.