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Author Topic: False Neutrals  (Read 1581 times)

VT Rocker

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False Neutrals
« on: August 25, 2011, 03:38:04 PM »
I am having a fair amount of difficulty with false neutrals in my 2009 G-5 Deluxe, both going up the gears and down.  Occasionally I would find these on my old British bikes (Nortons, BSAs, Triumphs) but nowhere near as often.  I fear downshifting going into turns with power because sometimes I release the clutch to find I'm in another neutral.

Is this behavior typical of these bikes or do you folks think I have an especially sloppy transmission.

Are there any alterations, techniques others have found to reduce the occurance?

Thanks

rbelyk

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2011, 03:58:11 PM »
I was getting that as well when I first got my bike in June, especially going into 4th
after reading the forums it sounded like a normal thing that would get better as the bike got broken in, it did seem to clear up after the first service or I just got used to it, but now its back with a vengance, today it was every gear and it popped out of a couple
I am taking it in to the dealer to have them look at it. if it makes it there  ???
its also developed a ticking sound like tappets in an old car, similar to Wills problem.
 :o
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r80rt

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2011, 04:01:51 PM »
It will be a different bike when you have somewhere around 2000 miles on the clock.
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VT Rocker

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2011, 04:22:11 PM »
Would be nice if it gradually subsided.  I have 1700 miles on it.

I love the bike otherwise and have been smiling all the way to work and back for the first time in years.

WillW

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2011, 04:43:34 PM »
Some folk notice a change for the better when they change to fully synth.
I have become aware of the extent to which even subtle changes in mood and attitude affect my riding. You'd never notice it in a car, but on a bike it's uncanny. I have rides sometimes when my shifting is all over the place, missed gears, loud clunking shifts, etc. Next time, smooth as butter, faultless gear shifting.
It's nothing to do with the bike, and all to do with me being a bit out of the zone without even knowing it. Just little shifts in mood & attitude which just don't matter in a car are greatly magnified on two wheels.
Worth noticing.....
« Last Edit: August 25, 2011, 05:10:56 PM by WillW »
2010 Royal Enfield Electra (G5) DL

2004 Kawasaki W650
~ the best british bike they never made ~

barenekd

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2011, 08:40:18 PM »
There is a weird shifting arm called a striker that pushes or pulls on some pins that rotate the shifting fork cam. This little item has a hairpin return spring that keeps the striker in contact with the pins. It appears that  it may take awhile to loosen up so it keeps in contact with the pins properly.If that spring is broken it will cause all kinds of shifting problems.
It looks like it may possibly be accessed where the shifting mechanism enters the gearbox under the right engine case.
Have the dealer check it out.
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aikischmid

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2011, 01:31:54 AM »
Nice to read this thread. My new 2011 G5 has just 150 miles on it - I've only had it just a couple weeks now. I love it so much, and feel much more comfortable and confident riding it since I just passed my 3-day motorcycle safety course and have a real bona-fide motorcycle endorsement now. I've been following the break-in procedure, just riding around town, varying speeds frequently and have not yet taken her over 50 mph. But I've definitely noticed that I get lots of false neutrals. At first I thought it was because I was not shifting properly, but I know that's not the case now - I'm riding it perfectly competently. But like everytime I take her out, I always get at least one false neutral, usually more.
So from this thread I gather just stay the course and it should resolve as the bike gets broken in. If not, of course, thank God for the warranty and I can take it to the dealer for a look over.
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Arizoni

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2011, 01:49:49 AM »
IMO, most of the false neutrals folks have are caused by not using a firm positive motion of the foot all of the way to the place where the shift lever stops while shifting.

Yes, the shifting gets better as the parts wear in but until they do make a mental note to always move the lever all of the way to the stop.
I know sometimes I forget to do this and sometimes I will end up with a false neutral. :-[
Jim
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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2011, 01:56:49 AM »
From what I gather on the threads and personal experience, the break in proceedure not only seats the metal bits on the bike, but serves as an introductory period for the rider and bike. 'hello bike... Can I shift like this?..   No, you cant.. Hmm ok then, how about this... No...  Ok... Show me how you like  it...'    Its a compromise situation.  Just like a real flesh and blood woman, one must work on the relationship. My 'woman', Miss Bling, and I have a working relationship with regards to shifting. She sometimes doesnt like it when I drop too many gears coming to a slow down or almost stop without letting her clutch out first to grab a gear. once you get to know the woman... You can make her purrr...  Lol... 
میں نہیں چاہتا کہ ایک اچار
میں صرف اپنی موٹر سائیکل پر سوار کرنا چاہتے ہیں

Ducati Scotty

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2011, 09:46:14 PM »
Desi, never were truer words for bikes and women spoken ;D

bman734

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2011, 01:39:08 PM »
Try pressing harder when shifting up or down. I had a few problems with false neutrals too until I realized that it was a rider related issue causing this. Since changing my habits to pressing a little harder while shifting I have not had another problem since.
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VT Rocker

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2011, 02:58:27 PM »
I'm not convinced that the answer is in using more force.  In fact, since I began this thread, I've been experimenting a bit, and find that a softer foot appears to enhance by ability to hit the next gear while down-shifting.  On the other hand, a more determined lift from 2nd to 3rd seems to avoid a false neutral going up. 

So far, the three best pieces of advice appear to be:  1) move to synthetic oil (not done yet but will try) 2) wait a bit longer to see if the break-in helps reduce the numer of false neutrals  3) be a more sensitive guy and learn how to please my ride. ( The latter has been on my list for a longer time than my ownership of my Royal Enfield!)

VT Rocker

Raj V

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2011, 05:26:26 PM »
I was convinced of a false neutral in my B5. It has miraculously and completely disappeared after the first oil change and as I got to know the bike better. Changing gear is now as easy as it can be.

prof_stack

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2011, 02:05:48 AM »
Today on my 153 mile ride there were NO false neutrals or gears popping into neutral.  I usually shift firmly BUT I figured out what might be reason today.

I just moved the pegs so they are in the 12 o'clock position.  That, coupled with my boots being steel-toed, upshifts were always done at the steel part of the boot.  In other words, almost by definition the shifts were firm since the metal toes make a firm contact with the shift lever. 

That's way different than wearing soft shoes (which I think is dumb when riding...) and having the shoe compress more when you shift.
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Lwt Big Cheese

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Re: False Neutrals
« Reply #14 on: September 02, 2011, 02:09:46 PM »
I found fewer false neutrals once I adjusted the clutch and replaced the primary chain.

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