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Author Topic: Did the UCE save the company?  (Read 1667 times)

Blairio

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #30 on: April 20, 2013, 06:17:58 AM »
I think Enfield are being pragmatic - only changing something when:

a. there is a definite improvement to be had in terms of maintenance or performance, such as hydraulic tappets, improved lights
b. emissions controls demand cleaner running engines.

I really like the look of the UCE motor, although I think the more rounded RHS casing on the Enfield 'classic' engine looks slightly easier on the eye and more 'retro' than the one on my 'Electra' (G5).  Maybe one day I'll pick up a second hand 'classic' RHS casing. Does anyone know if it is a straight swap?
2012 Electra EFI Riviera Red
1954 Francis Barnett Falcon 70

Ice

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #31 on: April 20, 2013, 06:52:07 AM »
Adding to Ice's thoughts, the snail adjusters used to adjust the rear wheel are the same as those that were on the 1948 350cc Trials bike.
Like them or not, they are a historic part of the motorcycles design.

This Trials bike used the spring/shock mounted swing arm during a time that the other production motorcycles were either still building hardtails or using the vertical plunger rear suspension.

The method of making the rear mounting bracket for these spring/shocks hasn't changed much since 1949 when several of the Royal Enfields with the shock mounted swing arm were put into production.

Although Royal Enfield wasn't the first to sell motorcycles with this type of rear suspension the other companies that had used it were either out of business or had dropped the design.
This newly designed suspension resulted in Royal Enfield definitely being the reason the other companies tried to get their versions of it into production to replace their obsolete designs.

The headlight casquette on the current Royal Enfields with its twin parking light "eyes" is basically the same as those that were used on the 1954 Bullet, the 500 Twin and the Meteor.

The new UCE engine is still using a built in separate oil tank built into the engine along with the dry sump just like the Royal Enfields have always used on their 4 stroke engines.

The best part of it is there is nothing phony.  They didn't have to "recreate" any of it because Royal Enfield has been using all of these old designs from the time they were first introduced.

To Underscore what brother Arizoni said



 The only known surviving '48 G2 factory works trials Bullet lovingly restored ( and regularly ridden) by it's current owner Jim Hemingway.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mfZ4Res-9o
I can break it better,,,,at night, in the rain, on the trail,, 20 miles from nowhere.

REA #136

"TIMEX", the '06 Iron Barrel Military that takes me everywhere I want to go... and some places I shouldn't.

The_Rigger

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2013, 05:16:07 PM »
R.E.'s sales in the US have grown while sales of other marques have continued to decline.

Perhaps, but Enfield's US sales for a year still wouldn't equal one month's sales for H-D, BMW, or the Japanese Big Three...
-Dave
2012 C5 Special
Central Michigan, USA (when I'm not working somewhere else)

The_Rigger

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #33 on: April 20, 2013, 05:18:29 PM »
Total world wide exports >3,000. US imports >700.

And that, I suspect, is why it (sometimes) takes so damn long to get repair parts from the factory.
-Dave
2012 C5 Special
Central Michigan, USA (when I'm not working somewhere else)

Blairio

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #34 on: April 20, 2013, 05:40:02 PM »
In the Scotland, Enfield riders are definitely a (distinguished) minority, and while it would be great to see more on the road (for instance to keep people who work in the dealerships in jobs), it isn't going to happen overnight.  The UCE engine does seem a real asset in attracting riders from other brands, who want the 'heritage' of Enfield, but their home comforts such as electric start, low maintenance, and an absence of oil on the garage floor. The TV series with Charlie Boorman and Ewan McGregor apparently did wonders for BMW's GS sales. Perhaps filming a similar odyssey on Bullets would give the brand similar boost outside India? I'll bet there are Bullets which have gone where no GS could go.......
2012 Electra EFI Riviera Red
1954 Francis Barnett Falcon 70

Guaire

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #35 on: April 21, 2013, 12:34:28 AM »
Now you've got my attention.
Cheers,
Bill

Ice

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #36 on: April 21, 2013, 06:24:30 AM »
~ I'll bet there are Bullets which have gone where no GS could go.......

Yes.....yes there is.
I can break it better,,,,at night, in the rain, on the trail,, 20 miles from nowhere.

REA #136

"TIMEX", the '06 Iron Barrel Military that takes me everywhere I want to go... and some places I shouldn't.

Joel-in-dallas

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #37 on: April 29, 2013, 09:58:56 PM »
One thing is for sure...... Since the UCE they have been selling MANY more units per year.

More than 5 years ago it looks like they were selling 40,000 to 50,000 a year. Thats a HUGE change. I really enjoy my 2011 G5 Standard in Green.

Here is what the Financial Times says about Eicher Motors:

Eicher Motors Limited (EML) is an India-based company which operates in the automobile industry. The Company's and its subsidiary companies business activities falls within a single primary business segment, which include Automobile products and related components. The Company's products include motorcycles and components. It also manufactures and markets the Royal Enfield motorcycles. During the year ended December 31, 2012, total exports in were 3,532 units, and total sales volume of Royal Enfield was 113,432 motorcycles. . During 2012, the Company launched the all new Thunderbird 500 and Thunderbird 350 motorcycle. The Company's subsidiaries include Eicher Trucks and Buses (ETB), Volvo Trucks India (VTI), Eicher Engineering Components (EEC) and Eicher Engineering Solutions (EES).

young gun

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Re: Did the UCE save the company?
« Reply #38 on: May 03, 2013, 05:30:43 AM »
From what I have read, Royal Enfield, can't keep up with local demand let alone international. Bear in mind that in India, Royal Enfield is regarded as a premium brand and this is a country where cheap transportation is a necessity. Theres evidently an 8 month waiting list on these bikes in India?! I don't think the UCE engine saved the brand at all, it's been going for the last 70 years without issues, I just think it was time for a more modern and emission friendly design.

If you take a look at numbers, RE exported 3000 bikes to the US in 2012, that was out of a total production of 114000 or something to that effect, and the US is their biggest importer!

We are talking about 1.2 billion people in India, if you can sell to just 5% of that market you are set for life :) I think international sales are important but they don't even scratch the surface when it comes to local sales.

Just my 2c.