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December 22, 2014, 10:52:58 PM

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Author Topic: Engine problems  (Read 1244 times)

ERC

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #75 on: December 11, 2014, 05:13:11 PM »
Thanks  Ace.   :-X  ERC
2-57 Apaches, 2-57 Trailblazers, 60 Chief, 65 Interceptor, 2004 Bullet, 612 Bullet chopped.

Mr.Mazza

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #76 on: December 11, 2014, 07:34:28 PM »
It is a very dedicated group!
My next issue is, how to deal with not riding for a month or so! :(
Lizzy - 07 500 Deluxe ES - Red and chrome

Arizoni

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #77 on: December 11, 2014, 10:32:10 PM »
Mr.Mazza
Glad to hear your getting your engine fixed. :)

For what it's worth, a large part of Ace's head rework involves improving the gas flow thru the heads ports.
This is not a matter of simply enlarging them by removing material.  It is more, reshaping them so the gasses flow smoothly without dead spots and turbulence.

Knowing what the best shape and size should be is the trick and only thru extensive airflow testing can this be found.  Ace has done this testing and knows the answer.

Anyway, hopefully you will get your engine back together so you can get back on the road. :)
Jim
2011 G5 Deluxe
1999 Miata 10th Anniversary

Mr.Mazza

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #78 on: December 12, 2014, 01:51:17 AM »
Mr.Mazza
Glad to hear your getting your engine fixed. :)

For what it's worth, a large part of Ace's head rework involves improving the gas flow thru the heads ports.
This is not a matter of simply enlarging them by removing material.  It is more, reshaping them so the gasses flow smoothly without dead spots and turbulence.

Knowing what the best shape and size should be is the trick and only thru extensive airflow testing can this be found.  Ace has done this testing and knows the answer.

Anyway, hopefully you will get your engine back together so you can get back on the road. :)

It sounds like weird and wonderful engineering!
The build will start with a super strong bottom end hopefully with a Carrilo Rod, custom piston head, lighten and trued crank, all that balanced up. Euro main bearings with a nice Roller Big End. High flow oil pumps and maybe open some galleries up, better breathing. Alloy cylinder, upgrade the clutch n shit.
Then once I have the money get a head done by ace and slap that on, RE dyno tune it and a Newby belt drive and Crank ignition. Until then Ill do a quick clutch upgrade and Elec Ignition.
Also possibly a disk or just race up the drum!
Lizzy - 07 500 Deluxe ES - Red and chrome

RE_Chief

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #79 on: December 12, 2014, 11:34:17 PM »
Basil at Headworks can port your head and put hardened seats in as well as fitting any new valves if you decided to get a larger exhaust valve, he is highly competent and knows what he is doing.  Has a copy of "Need for Speed" on his work bench if you know the title you know it's the bible.

http://recoainc.com/?page_id=638

Basil does most of the vintage and classic motorcycle work in Melbourne, he is your man. 

As far as rebuilding your engine goes, well you don't need to 'Fireball' your motor to get a reliable freeway ready motorcycle.  You need a roller big end, a decent conrod, a decent piston, modded head (ported, larger exhaust valve), you may consider improving the oil pump getting high lifting cams, and getting a 30ml carby.  No need for samrat rockers the standard ones are fine just make sure yours do not have any wear marks.  You don't need to go to a 535 to have a reliable Bullet. 

There are plenty of people in Melbourne who know how to rebuild these motors properly.

Regards Charles
1955 Indian Tomahawk 500 twin
1958 Indian Chief 700 twin (SMPB 9002 the 2nd ever made)
1960 Indian Chief 700 twin
1964 Interceptor Mk1 750 twin
1967 Interceptor Mk1A 750 twin
1994 Bullet Deluxe 570 long stroke single

Arizoni

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #80 on: December 13, 2014, 04:37:52 AM »
Although I like your list it didn't include something I think is very important for improving the reliability of a iron barrel.

A sleeved alloy cylinder. :)

IMO, one of the iron barrels biggest downfalls is its iron barrel.

Cast Iron conducts heat very poorly.  That's why you can have a cast iron frying pan that's hot enough to fry an egg while you can still grab the handle without badly burning your hand, at least for a while.

Cast aluminum conducts heat about 4.6 times better than cast iron.  (This value in the US is usually given as a BTU/hr/sq. ft./degree F/ft value.  Note that distance is one of the important factors.)

That means for any linear distance 4.6 times as much heat can be conducted away from the piston and cylinder wall per minute or second.

Although the alloy cylinder has a steel liner in it and the steel liner is also poor at conducting heat the fact that the liner is thin means the heat doesn't have far to travel at the slower value before it gets to the aluminum which rapidly conducts the heat away.

All of this results in the iron barrels old nemesis, heat, being dealt with so the possibility of overheating and piston seizure are greatly reduced.
Jim
2011 G5 Deluxe
1999 Miata 10th Anniversary

RE_Chief

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #81 on: December 13, 2014, 06:28:45 AM »
Sorry meant "Tuning for Speed".

I don't think you need to change them from being an iron barrel to make them reliable.  I am not aware of any  motors blowing up once they have been built with the list I have suggested in Australia, and Australia gets hot.  But each to their own.  The list I suggest is all that is needed but everyone will have their own opinions.

Regards Charles
« Last Edit: December 13, 2014, 08:35:54 AM by RE_Chief »
1955 Indian Tomahawk 500 twin
1958 Indian Chief 700 twin (SMPB 9002 the 2nd ever made)
1960 Indian Chief 700 twin
1964 Interceptor Mk1 750 twin
1967 Interceptor Mk1A 750 twin
1994 Bullet Deluxe 570 long stroke single

cafeman

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #82 on: December 13, 2014, 11:59:53 AM »
The way I look at the subject of whether to go with an alloy or iron barrel is if I had both sitting on my work bench, or they were priced the same..........I'm grabbing the alloy one every time without a doubt. As to why is elementary. To not is purely an economic decision. IMO.
Bikes-Bikes-Bikes!!!
Current Fleet: 2001 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Cafe Racer
                     1996 Yamaha Seca II
                     1991 Husqvarna 350WXE
                     1991 KTM 250MX
                     2004 Husqvarna TC450

ace.cafe

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #83 on: December 13, 2014, 01:54:07 PM »
Of course. There are all kinds of levels and qualities of rebuilds and modifications. Anybody can choose what they want to do.


Mr.Mazza

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #84 on: December 13, 2014, 10:48:38 PM »
Although I like your list it didn't include something I think is very important for improving the reliability of a iron barrel.

A sleeved alloy cylinder. :)

IMO, one of the iron barrels biggest downfalls is its iron barrel.

Cast Iron conducts heat very poorly.  That's why you can have a cast iron frying pan that's hot enough to fry an egg while you can still grab the handle without badly burning your hand, at least for a while.

Cast aluminum conducts heat about 4.6 times better than cast iron.  (This value in the US is usually given as a BTU/hr/sq. ft./degree F/ft value.  Note that distance is one of the important factors.)

That means for any linear distance 4.6 times as much heat can be conducted away from the piston and cylinder wall per minute or second.

Although the alloy cylinder has a steel liner in it and the steel liner is also poor at conducting heat the fact that the liner is thin means the heat doesn't have far to travel at the slower value before it gets to the aluminum which rapidly conducts the heat away.

All of this results in the iron barrels old nemesis, heat, being dealt with so the possibility of overheating and piston seizure are greatly reduced.

I did put an Alloy Cylinder! :p
One of the major changes for cooling haha.
Bike gets picked up today and ill tag along and pull the head off as I wanna get into this rebuild as much as my free time permits.
Lizzy - 07 500 Deluxe ES - Red and chrome

rtillery02

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Re: Engine problems
« Reply #85 on: December 15, 2014, 06:04:46 PM »
Man, not ridin for that long would have me in the therapy line, & I hate that for ya. but a fresh engine always makes me smile. I've giv'n a lot of thought to "fireball"n my bullet but, I really don't "need" a thorough upgrade like that, just a reliable stock powerplant should serve me well(& it has) BUT... If the bottom end rebuild day ever comes, I'll probably do some serious pricing with ACE & step up its' game. Any out of town rides I tend to take on my Boulevard anyway, In town scoots are on "Ollie" so, I expect many more miles before that time comes.  But I'm glad you got a rebuild in the makin.
Some Folks Grow Old & Wise, &
Some Folks Just Grow Old.