HPRE

Menu

Members Rides

My Electra X


in
Members Rides

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 26, 2014, 03:01:52 AM

Login with username, password and session length

 

Author Topic: Buying a new Enfield  (Read 1531 times)

charger72

  • Neophyte
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
Buying a new Enfield
« on: December 08, 2007, 03:35:11 AM »
Hi, every body. I am serously interested in buying a new enfield, but I have some concerns.
First of all, I am used to riding an old Honda CB 550, and on paper it seems to be a superior machine, but it 32 years old, and I spend 3 hours working on it for every hour I ride it. Do these Enfield motorcycles have enough motor to carry a large guy at 55-60 mph without overheating or causing unnessesary wear and tear?

Also, I would like to get the stroker crank, but I was told that these are not well suited to road use due to heat, and that they were designed for racing. Have any of you guys had any trouble with heat or anything when doing displacment increases?

Thanks guys!

Thumper

  • Psalm 23
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1065
  • Karma: 1
  • Classic Wannabe
Re: Buying a new Enfield
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2007, 10:21:00 PM »
Hi, every body. I am serously interested in buying a new enfield, but I have some concerns.
First of all, I am used to riding an old Honda CB 550, and on paper it seems to be a superior machine, but it 32 years old, and I spend 3 hours working on it for every hour I ride it. Do these Enfield motorcycles have enough motor to carry a large guy at 55-60 mph without overheating or causing unnessesary wear and tear?

Also, I would like to get the stroker crank, but I was told that these are not well suited to road use due to heat, and that they were designed for racing. Have any of you guys had any trouble with heat or anything when doing displacment increases?

Thanks guys!

C72,
I've had my share of decades-old japanese bikes resurrected and put back on the road. And despite their superb engineering, after twenty or more years electrics go bad, seals degrade, bearings become pitted. A new Bullet should prove more reliable - and definitely won't a need 3:1 maintenance-to-riding ratio; proably only 2:1! (Just kidding).

A new Bullet could cruise at 55. If by large you mean over 200lbs, that might be a factor. Otherwise, probably not.

As a thumper, the RE will reward you with wear and tear after long rides. If for nothing else, just to remind you who's boss.

If you're considering ways to improve performance, top speed, etc. even before you purchase it, the RE might not be the best fit for you.

HTH,
Matt

baird4444

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 2107
  • Karma: 0
  • 2003 ES 500... 38,416 miles, I'm done
Re: Buying a new Enfield
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2007, 10:50:30 PM »
Yes the Bullet will do it. I cruize at 63 indicated which is about 58 real world speed; with just an opened up silencer and free breathing air filter. There is a growing belief that the Electra will do better but I like the 50+ year pedigree of my Bullet. If you are looking for an interstate cruiser...  KEEP LOOKING.
 In the words of Dan Holmes "these Bullets are for the road less traveled".
   It sounds like you've got the wrenching skills to keep a Bullet going. There will be constant adjusting in the beginning but it is all part of the "Bonding" process that takes place. A careful run-in is the best way to "Bond" and learn about your machine.
   Stroker crank??  Why?? Remember that the Bullet is a well balanced machine. When you upgrade a part you maybe putting undo stress on the next weakest part causing failure. I guess I just prefer to ride and tinker than to chase and replace the next weakest part.
Mike in central Illinois
"You can't drink all day if you don't start in the morning!! "
        -Cody Baird
'My dear you are ugly,
 but tomorrow I shall be sober and you will still be ugly'
 - Winston Churchill

indian48

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 225
  • Karma: 0
Re: Buying a new Enfield
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2007, 11:16:49 PM »
Ride and tinker sums it up for me too - I have the same concerns about an upgrade throwing the balance of the system out of kilter by stressing the next weakest part. Once I finish the run in, I intend to get it to breathe in and out better, and then maybe tweak its diet a bit - carb rejetting - but beyond that, do just the riding and tinkering. I have pursued other hobbies in the past, one being high end audio as an example, where I got the upgrade addiction, and soon the equipment and its technicalities overcame its purpose - the music. I do not want to go down that path with the Bullet! I have since sold most of the fancy adds and find myself enjoying the music a lot more,,,
But I do recognize the truth in the different strokes for different folks thinking.
If anything is worth doing, it is worth doing well